Our Liberations Are Connected: Passover’s Meaning in 2016

Esther Cohen

is a novelist and poet living in New York City. She’s the author of several books, including Book Doctor. Read more of her writing on her blog I Am and I Am Not.

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April 28th, 2016

Our lives and our liberations are bound up in each other. A photo-poem exploration of hope, freedom, and the meaning of exodus.

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December 13th, 2015

For the final night of Hanukkah, a poem brought on by Allen Ginsberg.

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December 12th, 2015

The penultimate night celebrates getting older and the embers within.

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December 11th, 2015

Finding the light isn’t difficult if you find the kindness that stands before you in the face of someone you may never have met. A poem for Hanukkah.

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December 10th, 2015

Just past the midpoint of the festival of lights, a glowing reminder that people sometimes say no.

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December 9th, 2015

The light of Hanukkah can be found in the voice. A postcard on the fondness of listening and the musical warmth of words.

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December 8th, 2015

Sometimes a poem offers insight into a dream or an event in the news. And sometimes it’s about the everyday thing that never occurs.

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December 7th, 2015

To round out the second day of Hanukkah, a poem on bringing the light through the art of asking.

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December 6th, 2015

Our first postcard from Hanukkah reminds us of the importance of light, and to find it wherever we can: in strangers, in family, in friends.

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September 13th, 2015

For the Jewish High Holy Days, two poems by Esther Cohen paired with photography from Matthew Septimus. They offer words that sound like music, and postcards that become visual prayers and emblems of hope.

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May 9th, 2015

What unites us all is that we all have mothers. A poet traces the path of her life through her Rumanian grandmother and the women who followed.

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April 10th, 2015

The opportunity to hear and tell stories, holidays or not, is one of the great pleasures and lucky miracles of life. A picture and a short poem for the final day of Passover.

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April 9th, 2015

Some days you remember forever and ever. A picture and a poem to celebrate Haggadah possibilities during Passover.

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April 8th, 2015

A rabbi once said that life consists of 72 stories. As we yearn to find ways to be together in this world, we’re reminded that it’s always in the telling.

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April 7th, 2015

What do we mean when we use the word freedom? Matthew Septimus and Esther Cohen celebrate the many Haggadah possibilities with a poem and a picture.

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April 6th, 2015

Holidays like Passover create occasions for encounter, however strange they may be. And those encounters may lead to friendships that create new possibilities.

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April 5th, 2015

For this third day of Passover, Matthew Septimus and Esther Cohen celebrate the many possibilities with a poem and a picture.

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April 4th, 2015

What if we overcame our tribal impulses and told stories that grew our imagination as a people?

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April 3rd, 2015

Passover is a holiday with thousands and thousands of Haggadah possibilities. A poet and a photographer celebrate, each year, with a poem, and a picture.

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December 23rd, 2014

Forgiveness is at the center of the connection between history and the future. For the final night of Hanukkah, poet Esther Cohen and photographer Matthew Septimus offer this postcard for your reflection.

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December 22nd, 2014

Lighting the candle on the seventh night of Hanukkah, a postcard on the vocabulary of hope and the interconnectedness of two peoples.

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December 21st, 2014

On night six of Hanukkah, poet Esther Cohen and photographer Matthew Septimus light a candle to the woman who lives fully and dances with the valleys.

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December 20th, 2014

Night five of our series. A poem inspired by a Harlem church experience by a secular Jew paired with a Septimus photo.

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December 19th, 2014

Our photo-poem for this Hanukkah evening, a reflection on the sacred ordinariness of holy people and holy places — even at a supermarket in upstate New York.

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December 18th, 2014

“People prefer winners and losers. Maccabees rising against Greeks.” The third photo-poem in our series from Matthew Septimus and Esther Cohen on the stories of success we tell each other.

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December 17th, 2014

A prayer for the poet who doesn’t pray. The second in an eight-part series from a photographer and a poet exploring the sacred in the mundane.

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December 16th, 2014

The first of eight vignettes by photographer Matthew Septimus and poet Esther Cohen on holy people and holy places that transcend the ordinary.

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