On Being Blog

Wednesday, October 8, 2008 - 15:51

In this video, guest blogger Eboo Patel interviews pastor Rick at the 2008 Clinton Global Initiative and offers his perspective as a Muslim.

Friday, October 3, 2008 - 22:13
Friday, October 3, 2008 - 16:30

Well, Ramadan is officially over and I’ve spent the past few days at various parties celebrating by eating, eating, and, oh yeah, eating. What ends up happening on Eid (after the morning communal prayer at the mosque) is usually this circuit of house visits, going from family to family, eating, popping in and out, eating, seeing people, chatting, eating, then heading off to another house party. At each new house, I’m just too polite to say, “I understand you’ve been slaving over a hot stove all day, but I just came from two other parties. I can’t eat anymore. Touch my belly. Touch it!”

Yesterday was thankfully free of parties, as is tonight, but apparently my cousin and his family (and I) are booked for two Saturday parties, the first at 11:00 am. It’s going to be a long day. To what could I compare all this? Thanksgiving—both the word and the holiday. Eid is basically several days of eating and socializing and, hopefully, feeling happy to be alive.

Thursday, October 2, 2008 - 11:44

Monday, September 29, 2008 - 13:37

On Thursday night before the debate, I wrote something that meant a great deal to me. It was about a trip I made to Ole Miss in August and the incredible symbolism of that the debate on that campus, a cultural triumph it signified far larger than who won or lost.

The drama in financial markets nearly stopped the debate completely, and overshadowed a few hours of reflection we might have allowed ourselves on race. But Scott Simon did a lovely piece on Saturday morning, and Slate produced this: “Negro to Address Ole Miss Class” (The headline you won’t be reading about tonight’s presidential debate.) A white presidential candidate in civil debate against a black presidential candidate is a monumental, quiet victory of a milestone worth pondering, and celebrating, in a world in which bad news gets all the attention.


Friday, September 26, 2008 - 15:41

Our managing producer takes a sharp look at our journalistic profession's cultural appropriation of stereotypes in the political season.

Thursday, September 25, 2008 - 12:03

Krista reflects on a recent trip she took to Oxford, Mississippi — the setting for the first 2008 U.S. presidential debate.

Thursday, September 25, 2008 - 11:54

An excellent reflection on the playlist for "Days of Awe."

Tuesday, September 23, 2008 - 16:04

In this TED talk, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt breaks down human moral values into five basic elements, then shows how an individual's placement on the liberal-conservative spectrum is determined by how much emphasis that person puts on each of these values.

Monday, September 22, 2008 - 10:57

This SOF video captures the international flavor of the Azusa Street Centennial in song by a couple from Zimbabwe.

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