On Being Blog

Monday, April 27, 2009 - 16:06

Krista Speaks from the PulpitOver these past five years, I’ve been utterly charmed with the effort that’s put into producing a weekly national program. We’ve been making great commitments to reveal this part of the process through releasing Krista’s unedited interviews, videotaping editorial sessions and face-to-face interviews, and blogging about the correspondence we have among our staff and the ideas that inform our roles.

But, commitments require Krista (and sometimes staff) to speak at public and private events — ranging from speaking engagements at our funders’ board meetings to lectures at local public radio stations’ fundraising events. These forums can be quite inspirational and enlightening, revealing another aspect of Speaking of Faith’s mission to reach larger and more varied audiences.

Thursday, April 23, 2009 - 16:21

Earlier this week, I posted a quote on our Facebook page from Eulalia Cobb. She’s a listener from West Pawlet, Vermont who wrote a lovely reflection in response to last week’s show on her practice of mindfulness while spring cleaning a chicken coop:

“In years past, I rushed impatiently through this coop cleaning. After all, there was a garden to be planted…”

What I find so delightful about posting wonderful words like Eulalia’s outside the bounds of speakingoffaith.org is the broad knowledge base and interesting insights we may not have learned otherwise. Many times this wisdom serves as a fresh starting point for fans who may not have happened across these quirky, endearing stories. And that’s why I absolutely dug Denise Klitsie’s comment in response:

Monday, April 20, 2009 - 16:34

I’ve been skeptical about celebrity pet charity projects and rock stars like Bono who have endorsed the RED campaign — encouraging people to shop and buy stuff in order to aid impoverished Africans. It just rings hollow to me and somewhat paradoxical, even though I recognize the good intentions behind it.

And then I read these lines from his op-ed this weekend:

It’s Lent I’ve always had issues with. I gave it up … self-denial is where I come a cropper. My idea of discipline is simple — hard work — but of course that’s another indulgence.

Then comes the dying and the living that is Easter.
—Bono, lead singer of U2

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Friday, April 17, 2009 - 08:43

Watch Kabat-Zinn's entire presentation at Google headquarters (and the excerpt from the show).

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Friday, April 17, 2009 - 08:38

A video of Jon Kabat-Zinn's presentation at MIT as he reflects on life in a 24/7 networked world.

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Wednesday, April 15, 2009 - 09:32

Perhaps our guest's undergraduate college might have informed his work on mindfulness.

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Tuesday, April 14, 2009 - 02:40

Being mindful may mean you just can't shoot that next photo or journal that gorgeous sunset. A 3-minute TEDtalk.

Saturday, April 11, 2009 - 08:42

In our interview for next week’s show, the very thoughtful scientist/author Jon Kabat-Zinn has intriguing and provocative things to say about the pressures and possibilities of aligning our “Stone Age minds” with 21st-century digital realities. But he also says: “This is far too serious to take too seriously.”

The most godly people I know have a sense of humor even about the most important things, and I’m convinced God does too. And that is my far too serious justification for posting two very funny Facebook takes on Passover and Easter, the holiest of holidays being observed simultaneously this week. Be blessed — and enjoy.


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