On Being Blog

Saturday, June 27, 2009 - 05:51
Friday, June 26, 2009 - 13:55

Krista's looks to BBC 4's "Afternoon Plays" for inspiration in writing the script for this program.

Friday, June 26, 2009 - 06:51

A reflection on the different interpretations of a single poem and how one man's experience of suffering affects his reading of "Le Vase Brisé" ("The Broken Vase").

Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 19:30

A follow-up question about altruism studies results in encore answer.

Thursday, June 25, 2009 - 16:14

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Wednesday, June 24, 2009 - 16:27

The French geologist connects Dorothy Day, seismic activity, empathy, and the ability of the heart to continue to learn.

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Monday, June 22, 2009 - 21:16

Krista's conversation with Le Pichon draws connections to Karl Jaspers and Karen Armstrong.

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Friday, June 19, 2009 - 16:00

Remembering a snowed-in encounter with the Kenyan Nobel Laureate.

Friday, June 19, 2009 - 16:00

The late Joe Carter tells the back story of a well-known spiritual.

Friday, June 19, 2009 - 11:00

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One of the most extraordinary minds of American and global history, W.E.B. Du Bois penned the famous line that "the problem of the 20th century is the problem of the color line." He is a formative voice for many of the people who gave us the Civil Rights Movement. But his passionate, poetic words speak to all of us navigating the ever-unfolding, unfinished business of civil rights. We bring Du Bois' life and ideas into relief for the 21st century — featuring one of the last interviews the great Maya Angelou gave before her death.

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Who knew that we learn empathy, trust, irony, and problem solving through play — something the dictionary defines as "pleasurable and apparently purposeless activity." Dr. Stuart Brown suggests that the rough-and-tumble play of children actually prevents violent behavior, and that play can grow human talents and character across a lifetime. Play, as he studies it, is an indispensable part of being human.

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The surprising psychology behind morality is at the heart of social psychologist Jonathan Haidt’s research. “When it comes to moral judgments," he says, "we think we are scientists discovering the truth, but actually we are lawyers arguing for positions we arrived at by other means.” He explains “liberal” and “conservative” not narrowly or necessarily as political affiliations, but as personality types — ways of moving through the world. His own self-described “conservative-hating, religion-hating, secular liberal instincts” have been challenged by his own studies.

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