On Being Blog

Trent Gilliss Tuesday, April 15, 2014 - 05:16

This week, excellent insights from Howard Thurman and the growing edge of the beginner's mind, a meditation on suffering, advice from Bertrand Russell, and a beautiful photoquote from Yiddish poet Celia Dropkin.

Peter Han Monday, April 14, 2014 - 05:24

In the debate between scientific fact and religious faith, the author wonders if we, as skeptical people living in an age of science, have the capability believing in myth. Or, do we prefer living in a meaningless world.

Shari Motro Friday, April 11, 2014 - 19:49

How does one leave home in peace? Shari Motro reflects on how we all can find our way back, using the abundant lessons of the relationship between Pharaoh and Moses in the Exodus story. On the other side of it all, forgiveness and gratitude resides.

Trent Gilliss Thursday, April 10, 2014 - 18:27

The eighth of the great British philosopher's list of rules for living and learning. This time, on intelligent dissent.

Mariah Helgeson Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 05:52

Watch this TED talk with Andrew Solomon, who breaks the silence we share around depression and asks of us profound empathy for the vitality within the struggle.

Parker J. Palmer Wednesday, April 9, 2014 - 05:02

Parker Palmer encourages us to look with child-like imagination to better understand the world's mysteries.

Trent Gilliss Tuesday, April 8, 2014 - 22:21

The seventh of the great British philosopher's list of rules for living and learning. This time, on respecting eccentricity.

Trent Gilliss Monday, April 7, 2014 - 22:20

Our executive editor Trent Gilliss brings you his weekly column on articles worth reading, visuals worth seeing, music worth hearing. Including a remarkable story of curiosity and persistence, a mesmerizing rumination on Dante's Purgatorio, lessons to live by from Bertrand Russell, and some poetic twitterings with artist Dario Robleto.

Trent Gilliss Monday, April 7, 2014 - 18:01

The sixth of the great British philosopher's list of rules for living and learning. This time, on the opinions of others.

Susan Cooke Kittredge Sunday, April 6, 2014 - 08:14

With the recent news about the universe's origins, why are we struck dumb with awe and the nature of magnificence? A guest commentary on our deepest impulses.

Pages

Latest Interviews

July 24, 2014

Sculptural artist Dario Robleto is famous for spinning and shaping unconventional materials — from dinosaur fossils to pulverized vintage records, from swamp root to cramp bark. He joins words and objects in a way that distills meaning at once social, poetic, and scientific. He reveals how objects can become meditations on love, war, and healing.

July 17, 2014

Sixteen Muslims, in their own words, speak about the delights and gravity of Islam's holiest month. Through vivid memories and light-hearted musings, they reveal the richness of Ramadan — as a period of intimacy, and of parties; of getting up when the world is quiet for breakfast and prayers with one's family; of breaking the fast every day after nightfall in celebration and prayers with friends and strangers.

July 10, 2014

One of the most extraordinary minds of American and global history, W.E.B. Du Bois penned the famous line that "the problem of the 20th century is the problem of the color line." He is a formative voice for many of the people who gave us the Civil Rights Movement. But his passionate, poetic words speak to all of us navigating the ever-unfolding, unfinished business of civil rights. We bring Du Bois' life and ideas into relief for the 21st century — featuring one of the last interviews the great Maya Angelou gave before her death.

July 3, 2014

For the Fourth of July, a refreshing reality check about the long road of American democracy. We remember forgotten but fascinating, useful history as we contemplate how we might help young democracies on their own tumultuous paths now.

June 26, 2014

We tend to frame our cultural conversation about science and religion as a debate — two either/or ways of describing reality. With mathematician Jim Bradley and philosopher Michael Ruse, we trace a quieter evolution of science and religion in interplay — not a matter of competing answers, but of complementary questions with room for humanity, nuance, and humor.

apples