On Being Blog

Friday, October 30, 2009 - 13:40

The confluence of the rambunctious American ritual of Halloween with the somber and sobering feast days of All Saints and All Souls that follow on its heels has always been confusing to me — never more so than when I was a child. Halloween ranked second to Christmas for the near-hysteria of our anticipation.

The thrill of dressing up to be something scary was delicious, especially so because, as the smallest and youngest member of my large Catholic family, I was much more experienced at being scared than being scary. Halloween allowed me to become the monster. This, no doubt, is at the heart of its hold over us. We’re able to put on the clothing of that which frightens us: darkness and death itself.

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Wednesday, October 28, 2009 - 05:26

Setting the tone for an interview with Sitting Bull's grandson — with respect, grace, and humility.

Thursday, October 22, 2009 - 16:16

Anointing with Oil during Baptism Ceremony

This is a personal entry, in the spirit of the “Your Voices, Your Stories” door we open to you each week. I hope my experience will prompt you to share your own stories and reflections.

I’m a melting pot of religious identity: a lapsed Catholic, sometimes agnostic theist, envious of Buddhists, awed naturalist, live-by-the-golden-rule spiritual seeker. I worry that this may be off-putting, but maybe that’s my guilt as a “lapsed” Catholic.

Thursday, October 22, 2009 - 04:00
Wednesday, October 21, 2009 - 04:59

We often struggle with crafting interesting or catchy titles for each new program. Sometimes we latch on to something one of our guests said in the interview, as was the case with our recent program, which may win the dubious honor of having the longest title: Curiosity Over Assumptions, Interreligiosity Meets a New Generation.

But, please do know that it was not without much debate and extensive brainstorming among our entire staff to try to arrive at a title for the work of Aziza Hasan and Malka Haya Fenyvesi. With humility, I share some of the runners-up:

Tuesday, October 20, 2009 - 14:56

Krista Tippett Presents Ernie LaPointe with Tobacco Before Their Interview

Live Interview with Ernie LaPointe, Great Grandson of Sitting Bull
Trent Gilliss, online editor

UPDATE: In a delightful twist of events, I was able to set up a live video stream of Krista’s interview with Ernie LaPointe using his home wireless connection in the Black Hills of South Dakota. I also taped the conversation with a couple of HD cameras, and will do my best to produce this interview in the coming weeks.

Thanks to all for watched the interview. It’s gratifying to see several hundred people watched at least some of the conversation during the workday!


Monday, October 19, 2009 - 14:09

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