On Being Blog

Thursday, July 31, 2008 - 15:06

In this SoundSeen video not heard in the program, Jonathan Greenblatt tells Krista how his grandparents' flight from Nazi Germany informs his sense of service today — all from behind the glass.

Monday, July 28, 2008 - 16:26

If you didn’t know it, each member on our staff, including Krista, pretty much reads every piece of e-mail that’s sent to our inbox. And we receive a healthy amount of correspondence! But we’re also aware that there are many more conversations and responses to our show taking place in the greater online world, especially in blogs and social networking forums.

I thoroughly enjoy reading the increasing number of blog posts and articles about SOF, and commenting on others’ sites. Sometimes they’re simple observations or recommendations about a particular show, or entries that gave us new insights and ideas for future shows, as well as feedback on our productions. With a little link love, I thought I’d point out a few:

In her blog, Experiments in Physical Chemistry, Dawn Dennison wrote a gritty post about the power of play in her own life. She has a wonderful sense of the importance of play, and some good humor to boot:

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Monday, July 28, 2008 - 15:00

Being alive to the present moment, which Ram Dass gave us decades ago as the injunction to "Be Here Now" isn't a new idea, but it's back in a big way.

Thursday, July 24, 2008 - 12:27

Our online editor retraces the long tail of this program and the unexpected path leading up to the initial broadcast.

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Thursday, July 24, 2008 - 11:05

"The Dead Sea Scrolls" of Chinese theological history uncover an emotional side of Confucianism.

Wednesday, July 23, 2008 - 05:46

This sentence in The New York Times yesterday nearly made me choke on my organic lettuce (purchased at the coop):

“The highest form of luxury is now growing it yourself or paying other people to grow it for you,” said Corby Kummer, the food columnist and book author. “This has become fashion.”

Tuesday, July 22, 2008 - 06:08

New Scientist’s headline “‘Ten Commandments’ of race and genetics issued” possibly falls into the overly-clever-but-unnecessary category of journalistic wordplay. They took the easy way out; ashamedly, it grabbed my attention.

Mapping the human genome has raised many ethical questions about choices — controversial issues ranging from designer babies to personal privacy rights. But, the issue of using this greater level of genetic detail as a basis for racial stereotypes and discriminatory policies, well, that’s a quieter issue that perhaps has more pervasive reprecussions.

Stereotypes, such as the native physicality of African-American athletes, may be born out by such data, but we may not be taking into account the cultural and social factors that contribute to these conclusions. Because the data may feed our preconceptions and appear to be logical, the scientific methodologies may not be scrutinized as critically as they could be.

Tuesday, July 15, 2008 - 15:43

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