On Being Blog

Monday, February 11, 2013 - 07:19

"Even if you like living alone, that doesn't always mean you want to be alone." ~Lisa Napoli

Each Friday night, the author and journalist opens her door and throws a "party" in her LA abode. Anybody can come and socialize. It's such a lovely idea and seems like a great way to build relationships and foster community in one's own way. Great idea!

Sunday, February 10, 2013 - 05:01

From a spirited discussion on Paul Harvey and the American farmer to some out-of-this world photos to intriguing reads that will edify you and make you wonder why, our capsule of this week's best ideas and conversations.

Friday, February 8, 2013 - 06:00

Gone are the days, writes Harvard's Ousmane Kane, when Islam in Sub-Saharan Africa was considered more peaceful and different than in other parts of the world.

Thursday, February 7, 2013 - 06:30

A community college professor responds to Seth Godin's story with his student's poetry.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013 - 06:00

A retired exec-turned-woodturner follows his compass to reveal the inner beauty of felled trees in massive, delicate works of art.

Sunday, February 3, 2013 - 21:14

A testament to the power of religious language, Paul Harvey, and the dream of America presented through rural imagery?

Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 08:57

Our capsule of inspiration for the week includes a new way forward for visualizing our work, fantasy, Epiphany, and the sage words of a French Buddhist monk.

Friday, February 1, 2013 - 12:28

The second installment in our sketchnotes series that teases out the highlights of Krista's conversation with an American Muslim activist making a difference in Chicago.

Tuesday, January 29, 2013 - 04:13

A photographic tour of the biggest holiday for Ethiopian Orthodox Christians. The religious relic known as the Ark of the Covenant holds a special role in this celebration.

Sunday, January 27, 2013 - 05:04

This week's On Being roundup: Learning to be of interest to each other from Richard Blanco and Elizabeth Alexander, a guided meditation, and Twitter conversation about what the rise of "Nones" really says about America's religious landscape.

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Latest Interviews

April 24, 2014

The idea of reciting an unchanging creed sounds suspicious to modern ears. But the late, great historian Jaroslav Pelikan illuminated ancient tradition in order to enliven faith in the present and the future. He insisted that strong statements of belief will be necessary if pluralism in the 21st century is to thrive. We take in his moving, provocative perspective on our enduring need for creeds.

April 17, 2014

"The soul is contained in the voice."

StoryCorps founder David Isay and Krista Tippett have an intimate conversation about their shared love of listening — and the importance of creating spaces to tell our stories to each other. For him, the spaces where two people ask the questions they’ve always wanted to ask of each other are sacred. Listening, he’s learned, is an act of love. Eliciting and capturing our stories is a way of insisting that every life matters.

April 10, 2014

With a master of midrash as our guide, we walk through the Exodus story at the heart of Passover. It's not the simple narrative you've watched at the movies or learned in Sunday school. Neither Moses or Pharaoh, nor the oppressed Israelites or even God, are as they seem. As Avivah Zornberg reveals, Exodus is a cargo of hidden stories — telling the messy, strange, redemptive truth of us as we are, and life as it is.

April 3, 2014

An astrophysicist who studies the shape of the universe, Janna Levin has also explored her science by writing a novel about two pivotal 20th-century mathematicians, Kurt Gödel and Alan Turing. Both men pushed at boundaries where mathematics presses on grand questions of meaning and purpose. Such questions, she says, help create the technologies that are now changing our sense of what it means to be human.

March 27, 2014

"Your staying alive means so much more than you really know or that anyone is aware of at this moment."

Philosopher, historian, and poet Jennifer Michael Hecht has traced how Western civilization has at times demonized those who commit suicide, at times celebrated it as a moral freedom. She proposes a reframed cultural conversation, based not on morality or rights but on our essential need for each other.

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