— Lawyer and social critic Wendy Kaminer writes in The Atlantic about her debate with Femi Otitoju, a British equality campaigner and diversity consultant, on the moral limits of free speech.

Kaminer’s essay is a provocative and challenging perspective that really makes the reader think. I found myself creating scenarios in my mind and trying to think through all the options. I look forward to hearing from Ms. Otitoju when Intelligence Squared releases the video.

[via theatlantic]


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I also look forward to the release of the video on Intellligence Squared. This raises so many perplexing questions. The sketch of Femi Otitoju describes her as working toward equality and diversity. Apparently Ms. Kaminer believes there are no areas of agreement between she and Ms Otitoju. Is this really true? I'm hard pressed that Ms. Kaminer is opposed to a societal vision promoting equality and diversity. Is this attainable by supression of "hate speech", probably not. Has the US attained this by allowing freedom of speech ? In what way does allowing "hate speech" contribute to societal good ? I certainly value our right to freedom of speech, but perhaps if we could suspend seeing Ms. Otitoju's position only as a threat to our right, we could discuss this more constructively.

apples