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BY Lori Lakin Hutcherson July 23, 2016

We can begin to understand each other by asking the right questions — and listening to the stories we receive in turn. Lori Lakin Hutchinson sheds frank and essential light on the reality of racism in America.

On the Blog

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BY December 13, 2010

The filmmaker David Lynch has been a vocal advocate of transcendental meditation for some time now. But I’m quite intrigued with the work that his foundation is doing with returning veterans.

BY December 12, 2010

Poet Elizabeth AlexanderOn December 1, Krista interviewed Elizabeth Alexander, a poet probably best known for her poem “Praise Song for the Day”, which she delivered at the inauguration of President Barack Obama. We’re producing this show for release on January 6, our first show of the new year!

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BY December 10, 2010

Young Kashmiris demand independence from India, and redefine freedom.

BY December 09, 2010

President José Napoleón Duarte Visits with Mayor of Minneapolis
José Napoleón Duarte, president of El Salvador, speaks with Minnesota delegation while I place my microphone.

In the late 1980’s, an unlikely series of events carried me to Nicaragua, Honduras, and El Salvador to meet high-ranking political figures and rebel leaders. But, it was an unexpected encounter with an unknown woman in Managua during La Gritería that made the trip so memorable and changed the way I see the Advent season forever.

BY December 08, 2010

Do physical forms of worship like this contribute to the development of a child's faith and belief systems as she grows older?

BY December 08, 2010

WikiLeaks: Publishing the Unpublishable
Julian Assange of WikiLeaks speaks at the Hack in the Box security conference in Kuala Lumpur in 2009. (photo: Daryl Yeoh / Flickr, released under a Creative Commons 2.0 license)

WikiLeaks’ founder Julie Assange published an editorial in The Australian yesterday. In “Don’t shoot messenger for revealing uncomfortable truths” he presents WikiLeaks as a moral, journalistic enterprise whose ideological origins trace back to Assange’s Australian ancestral roots. He writes:

BY December 07, 2010

by Peter A. Friedrichs, guest contributor

Waiting at Disneyland
Awaiting Tiana’s Showboat Jubilee at Disneyland. (photo: huffmans/Flickr)

Advent is a time of waiting. For Christians, it’s a time of waiting for the arrival of the Christ child. For others, Advent is a time of waiting for a hoped-for future, waiting for the time of bleakness to pass and for new joy to arrive.

BY December 05, 2010

The Advent tension is a way of learning again that God is God: that between even our deepest and holiest longing and the reality of God is a gap which only grace can cross.
—Rowan Williams, A Ray of Darkness

BY December 04, 2010

Contrasting Similarities

Sometimes the most striking sequences present themselves in the most unexpected places, non? Two of my favorite Tumblrs — Been Thinking and Destin a Terre — posted these photos within seconds of each other and showed up on our Being Blog dashboard exactly in this order.

The scenes couldn’t be more different in temperature and climate and condition, but the mood and the tone make them long-time companions who stopped by the local pub for an ale. They’re both clean, minimalist without being bleak and sterile. And both scenes are just so beautiful.

BY December 03, 2010

The DodecahedronMy favorite dog-earred, page-stained book growing up was The Phantom Tollbooth. I must have read over 40 times about Milo’s quest through the Kingdom of Wisdom to reconcile the rulers of Dictionopolis, the lover of words, and Digitopolis, the lover of numbers. The conclusion of this book, and of John Allen Paulos’ recent post in The New York Times, is that both language and math should reign equally.

Paulos, a mathematician and professor, argues that while narratives and statistics play important roles, people approach them both with different mindsets:

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BY December 01, 2010

Do Christmas ham and potato latkes go together? Can Santa visit as well as Judah Maccabee?" ˜guest contributor Adena Cohen-Bearak reflects on reconciling Chanukah and Christmas.

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BY December 01, 2010

The dreidel's fascinating roots and origins in gambling give one mother (and rabbi) pause about sending "gold" coins to school. A guest contribution from Rebecca Schorr as Chanukah begins.

BY November 30, 2010

Winter has already taken root here in Minneapolis, but I haven’t let go of autumn yet. So I just couldn’t resist reblogging a small portion of this wonderful series of autumn photos by Jamie on her From Me to You blog, which she introduced with the caption: “As November slips away the last leaves fall on Central Park West making way for the winter air and snow filled trees…”

Be sure and view Jamie’s complete fall photo series on her site.


BY November 29, 2010

"Human Tapestry" by Marsha Glaziere

“Human Tapestry” is a three-dimensional painting running on and off the canvas that measures 6 feet high by 16 feet wide by 24 inches deep. The work is visual prospect for international peace and the continuation of life on our shared planet.

Eleven life-sized figures represent various countries and political ideologies. Each is draped in her own flag, her own nationalism, seemingly separate and distinct from that of any other country. While each flag is a symbol of a reciprocal system of language and customs of the people of an individual nation, it also serves to define geographic boundary lines on the earth.

The flag then becomes a symbol of separatism rather than alliance. Instead of recognizing our common human bonds and celebrating our universality, we see ourselves as isolated and often superior to one another.

BY November 28, 2010

A guest contributor reflects on how being still with life's deaths and resurrections connects her to the universe.

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