On Being Blog

Tuesday, July 15, 2008 - 15:43
Tuesday, July 15, 2008 - 15:30

So we’ve been trying to finally find someone to interview about the human animal bond, a show topic that’s been in the works for quite a while now. I was shocked to learn in my research just how much the relationship between humans and animals had changed over time. About 100 years ago, dogs in this country were primarily used for work on the farm, and rarely allowed inside the home. Today, 60-80% of dogs sleep with their owners at night in the bedroom, either in or on the bed.

Why have we gotten so much closer to these creatures? Is it our growing sense of displacement from nature that makes us want to form a bond with something non-human? Is it the same longing many people for natural places that a recent guest talked about in our show Pagans Ancient and Modern?

Friday, July 11, 2008 - 13:44

"crosswords" by m_m_mnemonic

After a group conversation about which Star Wars movie was the best one (discounting the new trilogy, obviously, my favorite The Empire Strikes Back has a strong following), I went out for lunch. In the food court nearest to our building, I saw at a distance a man sitting at a table, pencil in hand, his palm squeezing his forehead. He was looking down at some paper, and looked like he had to figure out a way to balance his finances or die. As I got closer, I saw what he was working on: a crossword puzzle. He was completely taken.

1
Thursday, July 10, 2008 - 06:04

A slideshow of two Iranian women talking about their art, courtesy of Keshavarz.

Wednesday, July 9, 2008 - 12:10
Tuesday, July 8, 2008 - 15:09

Krista reflects on the listener response and skepticism following the 2008 rebroadcast of the Barbara Kingsolver interview.

Monday, July 7, 2008 - 21:47
Tuesday, July 1, 2008 - 13:42

Ojibwe teacher Keller Paap reflects on his work and the necessity of his language to adapt in order for it to flourish.

Monday, June 30, 2008 - 15:23

"Antony Gormley: Olympic podium" by threefishsleeping

(photo: “Antony Gormley: Olympic Podium” by threefishsleeping/Flickr)

Our company’s marketing folks have asked us to put together a compilation CD featuring material from the past 12 months. This CD will be used to give to public-radio programming directors who are not familiar with the program, as well as to potential funders, and for other marketing uses.

Rather than some edited compilation, we’re thinking of putting together the first half of three separate programs on the CD (each half being about 25 minutes). That way, we can showcase the depth, intimacy and storytelling we aim for. The other criteria? The shows must have been produced in the past year.

1
Friday, June 27, 2008 - 15:50

An endearing story from Krista's conversation with Mayfair Yang, caught on video.

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