On Opinions: Bertrand Russell's Sixth Commandment

Monday, April 7, 2014 - 6:01pm
On Opinions: Bertrand Russell's Sixth Commandment

The sixth of the great British philosopher's list of rules for living and learning. This time, on the opinions of others.

Post by:
Trent Gilliss (@TrentGilliss),  Executive Editor / Chief Content Officer for On Being
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Thousands gather at Kicukiro College of Technology to commemorate the 2,000 people who were abandoned by United Nations troops during the 1994 genocide.

Credit: Chip Somodevilla License: Getty Images.

(6) Do not use power to suppress opinions you think pernicious, for if you do the opinions will suppress you.


~Bertrand Russell, from his "Ten Commandments" of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Times op-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."

See Russell's Fifth Commandment.

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Trent Gilliss is the driving editorial and creative force behind On Being. He received a Peabody Award in 2007 for his work on "The Ecstatic Faith of Rumi" and garnered two Webby Awards (in 2005, and again in 2008). The Online News Association nominated his journalistic work multiple times in the general excellence and outstanding specialty journalism categories. Trent's reported and produced stories from Turkey to rural Alabama, from Israel and the West Bank to Cambridge, England.

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