Palmer on Writing; Adichie on Singular Narratives; Blanton on Thin Places; Our Android App Is Ready; Khachaturian's 'Gayane Adagio'; Cosmic Microwaves?

Tuesday, March 25, 2014 - 9:00am
Palmer on Writing; Adichie on Singular Narratives; Blanton on Thin Places; Our Android App Is Ready; Khachaturian's 'Gayane Adagio'; Cosmic Microwaves?

This week provided some sage words on writing from Parker Palmer, a photo essay on "thin places" that take our breath away, a marvelous TED talk from a Nigerian writer, and a picture of the cosmos that stirs our origins.

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Trent Gilliss (@TrentGilliss),  Executive Editor / Chief Content Officer for On Being
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Hey there! If you missed the most recent edition of my weekly On Being newsletter, here's the blog version of what you might have missed. Catch up right here with Parker Palmer's advice on the writing life, Sarah Blanton's "thin places" in Tennessee, a Nigerian novelist's superb TED Talk on the danger of a single narrative, the cosmic microwaves of the universe's origins, and so much more. If you'd like to receive it in your email inbox, sign up here.

“There's no question about the reality of evil, of injustice, of suffering, but at the center of this existence is a heart beating with love. You and I and all of us are incredible. I mean, we really are remarkable things. That we are, as a matter of fact, made for goodness." ~Desmond Tutu from "A God of Surprises"


A cozy "writer's cabin" in the Wisconsin woods.

Credit: Chris Ford License: Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0).

I dare not bury the lead since it's such great news! Parker Palmer is on board. The Quaker elder's thoughtful vignettes contemplating life, work, and the motion of the world — all paired with a poem and a picture — will grace our site each Wednesday morning. We launch his weekly column with a poetic reminder that trusting the writing process itself will help you dig into your bafflement (and out of a snowy Spring):

"For me, writing is a miraculous process. It's as miraculous as Spring itself, when buds arise from frozen ground and greenery leafs out from wood that's hard and unyielding. For 50 years I've been writing almost daily. I'm driven not by expertise but by my own bafflement about many things — some of them 'in here' and some of them 'out there.' Every time I write, I'm surprised by what I discover about myself and/or the world. So I no longer wait until I have a clear idea to start putting words on the page. If I did, I'd never write a word!"

Read on. You'll be glad you did.

Last week, we released our new iPhone app. We heard a good deal of you clamor, understandably, for an Android version. Our Android app is ready! Please download, rate, and share with everybody you know.

Credit: Sarah Blanton

I am entirely grateful to people who see the world from fresh vantage points. In this guest contribution, Sarah Blanton (a professor of medicine at Emory University by day) offers this brilliant photo essay contemplating the Celtic concept of "thin places," spaces where the veil between visible and invisible worlds are lifted, and the transforming presence of beauty — all from a quiet lake nestled in the Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee:

"Being in the presence of a deep, quiet body of water gently surrounded by this wise mountain range pulls me out of the shallow fray of my frantic life to rest in a centered awareness. It is a threshold — a true 'thin place'."

Keep on submitting your essays and commentaries, photos and videos. On Being is a space that gives voice to all the curiosity and wonder of the many incredible voices that need to be heard. It's your platform for being heard.

The width of the observable universe: 92 billion light-years across. As NASA illustrates, the initial moments of our universe's existence were more dynamic than most anyone could've imagined. Gravity played its part. Amazing. Or, as Krista tweeted:

"In the beginning(s), such beauty."

An excellent TED Talk by Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie who speaks so eloquently about the danger of a single narrative. Our lives, our cultures, she says, are composed of many overlapping stories. If we don’t allow for the multiplicity of voices and narratives of a land and a people, then we risk something greater: understanding others, and ourselves.

What a gorgeous piece of music to wake up to: “Gayane’s Adagio” by the Armenian composer Aram Khachaturian. He’s better known for his frenetic "Sabre Dance"

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Many thanks. Please feel free to keep in touch. Write me at tgilliss@onbeing.org, or via Twitter at @trentgilliss.

May the wind always be at your back.

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Trent Gilliss is the driving editorial and creative force behind On Being. He received a Peabody Award in 2007 for his work on "The Ecstatic Faith of Rumi" and garnered two Webby Awards (in 2005, and again in 2008). The Online News Association nominated his journalistic work multiple times in the general excellence and outstanding specialty journalism categories. Trent's reported and produced stories from Turkey to rural Alabama, from Israel and the West Bank to Cambridge, England.

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if the multiverse theory is correct and there is an infinite amount of possible universes wouldn't there be one in which the multiverse theory was false?

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