On Being Blog

Wednesday, October 21, 2009 - 04:59

We often struggle with crafting interesting or catchy titles for each new program. Sometimes we latch on to something one of our guests said in the interview, as was the case with our recent program, which may win the dubious honor of having the longest title: Curiosity Over Assumptions, Interreligiosity Meets a New Generation.

But, please do know that it was not without much debate and extensive brainstorming among our entire staff to try to arrive at a title for the work of Aziza Hasan and Malka Haya Fenyvesi. With humility, I share some of the runners-up:

Tuesday, October 20, 2009 - 14:56

Krista Tippett Presents Ernie LaPointe with Tobacco Before Their Interview

Live Interview with Ernie LaPointe, Great Grandson of Sitting Bull
Trent Gilliss, online editor

UPDATE: In a delightful twist of events, I was able to set up a live video stream of Krista’s interview with Ernie LaPointe using his home wireless connection in the Black Hills of South Dakota. I also taped the conversation with a couple of HD cameras, and will do my best to produce this interview in the coming weeks.

Thanks to all for watched the interview. It’s gratifying to see several hundred people watched at least some of the conversation during the workday!


Monday, October 19, 2009 - 14:09
Sunday, October 11, 2009 - 10:20

There are books that become so important to us they become like old friends. Or, books that we find so transformative our lives are never the same. What are the books that have changed your life? What are the books that became your best friend?

Saturday, October 10, 2009 - 12:50

Stephanie FieldingAfter we replayed our program with David Treuer last week, we received an interesting story from listener Stephanie Fielding in Uncasville, Connecticut. In the program, Treuer talks about his efforts to help sustain the Ojibwe language:

“What I really love about language revitalization, what is so key to it, is that it’s always been ours and it’s a chance to define ourselves on and in our own terms and in ways that have nothing to do with what’s been taken. We can define ourselves by virtue of what we’ve saved.”

Friday, October 9, 2009 - 15:50

A Spanish magazine creates some translated magic of Krista's conversation with Jean Vanier.

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Thursday, October 8, 2009 - 15:08

Three scientists were awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Medicine for their work on telomeres — a term that came up in our interview with Doris Taylor. She explains that just as stress can shorten telomeres, they have the potential to be lengthened and extend life.

Tuesday, October 6, 2009 - 21:45

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