On Being Blog

Lily Percy Sunday, February 9, 2014 - 06:01

The daughter of an evangelical pastor finds comfort in the questions of an Orthodox rabbi — and his ability to change his mind on women's issues because of his relationship with his daughter.

Martin E. Marty Friday, February 7, 2014 - 07:19

Can something positive appear on a popular TV comedy show? An analysis of the "edgy Catholic Sunday School teacher and TV host as a catechist who can teach other catechists much."

Trent Gilliss Wednesday, February 5, 2014 - 11:01

Don't tweet. No problem. A compilation of our tweets of a wandering conversation with a maker on language, time, and life as a maker.

Kevin Douglas Grant Monday, February 3, 2014 - 06:30

Rather than leave her Orthodox tradition, Tova Hartman creates a community that acknowledges the "feminine side of prayer" and the difference of others.

Garrett Fugate Sunday, February 2, 2014 - 09:00

A former orthodox Christian and now queer-identifying Muslim graduate student reflects on the challenge of restoring wholeness in the broken landscape of orthodoxy and homosexuality.

Stephen Greene Friday, January 31, 2014 - 16:21

With folk-legend Pete Seeger's passing, a scholar reflects on the fragmented history of American music. He envisions a new path for unity: a beloved community of musical voices allied in song.

Trent Gilliss Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 05:52

Our interview with physicist and author brought about this fun and wide-ranging set of time-shift tweets. He brings an infectious excitement to the conversation about the frontiers of modern physics and how vital science is to understanding the nature of life and reality.

Trent Gilliss Monday, January 27, 2014 - 02:46

Happiness. A word that gets bandied about quite a bit lately, and for good reason. An infographic that jogs a host of questions and insights.

Mariah Helgeson Friday, January 24, 2014 - 16:58

There's something magical about the way Ann Hamilton inhabits space. This video will transport you to an extraordinary world of ordinary life observed by a maker.

Mariah Helgeson Tuesday, January 21, 2014 - 06:06

What happens when we choose anger and hatred over vulnerability and love? A short video with a World War II veteran who tells a personal story about being confronted by the German enemy and the power of music.

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Latest Interviews

July 24, 2014

Sculptural artist Dario Robleto is famous for spinning and shaping unconventional materials — from dinosaur fossils to pulverized vintage records, from swamp root to cramp bark. He joins words and objects in a way that distills meaning at once social, poetic, and scientific. He reveals how objects can become meditations on love, war, and healing.

July 17, 2014

Sixteen Muslims, in their own words, speak about the delights and gravity of Islam's holiest month. Through vivid memories and light-hearted musings, they reveal the richness of Ramadan — as a period of intimacy, and of parties; of getting up when the world is quiet for breakfast and prayers with one's family; of breaking the fast every day after nightfall in celebration and prayers with friends and strangers.

July 10, 2014

One of the most extraordinary minds of American and global history, W.E.B. Du Bois penned the famous line that "the problem of the 20th century is the problem of the color line." He is a formative voice for many of the people who gave us the Civil Rights Movement. But his passionate, poetic words speak to all of us navigating the ever-unfolding, unfinished business of civil rights. We bring Du Bois' life and ideas into relief for the 21st century — featuring one of the last interviews the great Maya Angelou gave before her death.

July 3, 2014

For the Fourth of July, a refreshing reality check about the long road of American democracy. We remember forgotten but fascinating, useful history as we contemplate how we might help young democracies on their own tumultuous paths now.

June 26, 2014

We tend to frame our cultural conversation about science and religion as a debate — two either/or ways of describing reality. With mathematician Jim Bradley and philosopher Michael Ruse, we trace a quieter evolution of science and religion in interplay — not a matter of competing answers, but of complementary questions with room for humanity, nuance, and humor.

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