Martin Luther King's Last Christmas Sermon

Friday, December 25, 2015 - 10:24am

Martin Luther King's Last Christmas Sermon

The way forward is to look back, to read and study the prescient wisdom of visionary leaders whose own brilliance blinds us to observations made during their quieter times. On Christmas day nearly a half-century ago, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. stood before his Christian congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta and gave a sermon, his final Christmas sermon. Four months later he would die at the hands of an assassin in Memphis, Tennessee.

I'd never heard this sermon before. Never read it. Or learned about it in my history classes. It was a Muslim scholar who called my attention to Dr. King's words. His foresight on the interdependency and the interconnectedness of a globalized world should stop readers in their tracks — especially on this Christmas day in 2015. He links the nature of our being with the promise of a Christ not fully realized, and he calls on us to acknowledge others living halfway around the world as our neighbors — and not the stranger living afar.

As we face global realities and fears, as we drink our coffee and unwrap our presents, Dr. King roots us in our humanity and the better nature within ourselves — despite the allure of our shadow sides. Read Dr. King's sermon aloud to your family and children on this sacred time of year, and remember the dream we must realize in the days ahead:

Peace on Earth…

This Christmas season finds us a rather bewildered human race. We have neither peace within nor peace without. Everywhere paralyzing fears harrow people by day and haunt them by night. Our world is sick with war; everywhere we turn we see its ominous possibilities. And yet, my friends, the Christmas hope for peace and goodwill toward all men can no longer be dismissed as a kind of pious dream of some utopian. If we don't have goodwill toward men in this world, we will destroy ourselves by the misuse of our own instruments and our own power. Wisdom born of experience should tell us that war is obsolete. There may have been a time when war served as a negative good by preventing the spread and growth of an evil force, but the very destructive power of modern weapons of warfare eliminates even the possibility that war may any longer serve as a negative good. And so, if we assume that life is worth living, if we assume that mankind has a right to survive, then we must find an alternative to war — and so let us this morning think anew on the meaning of that Christmas hope: "Peace on Earth, Good Will toward Men." And as we explore these conditions, I would like to suggest that modern man really go all out to study the meaning of nonviolence, its philosoph.y and its strategy.

We have experimented with the meaning of nonviolence in our struggle for racial justice in the United States, but now the time has come for man to experiment with nonviolence in all areas of human conflict, and that means nonviolence on an international scale.

Now let me suggest first that if we are to have peace on earth, our loyalties must become ecumenical rather than sectional. Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class, and our nation; and this means we must develop a world perspective. No individual can live alone, and as long as we try, the more we are going to have war in this world. Now the judgment of God is upon us, and we must either learn to live together as brothers or we are all going to perish together as fools.

Yes, as nations and individuals, we are interdependent. I have spoken to you before of our visit to India some years ago. It was a marvelous experience; but I say to you this morning that there were those depressing moments. How can one avoid being depressed when one sees with one's own eyes evidences of millions of people going to bed hungry at night? How can one avoid being depressed when one sees with one's own eyes thousands of people sleeping on the sidewalks at night? More than a million people sleep on the sidewalks of Bombay every night; more than half a million sleep on the sidewalks of Calcutta every night. They have no houses to go into. They have no beds to sleep in. As I beheld these conditions, something within me cried out:

"Can we in America stand idly by and not be concerned?"

And an answer came:

"Oh, no!"

And I started thinking about the fact that right here in our country we spend millions of dollars every day to store surplus food; and I said to myself:

"I know where we can store that food free of charge — in the wrinkled stomachs of the millions of God's children in Asia, Africa, Latin America, and even in our own nation, who go to bed hungry at night."

It really boils down to this: that all life is interrelated. We are all caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied into a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. We are made to live together because of the interrelated structure of reality. Did you ever stop to think that you can't leave for your job in the morning without being dependent on most of the world? You get up in the morning and go to the bathroom and reach over for the sponge, and that's handed to you by a Pacific islander. You reach for a bar of soap, and that's given to you at the hands of a Frenchman. And then you go into the kitchen to drink your coffee for the morning, and that's poured into your cup by a South American. And maybe you want tea: that's poured into your cup by a Chinese. Or maybe you're desirous of having cocoa for breakfast, and that's poured into your cup by a West African. And then you reach over for your toast, and that's given to you at the hands of an English-speaking farmer, not to mention the baker. And before you finish eating breakfast in the morning, you've depended on more than half of the world. This is the way our universe is structured, this is its interrelated quality. We aren't going to have peace on earth until we recognize this basic fact of the interrelated structure of all reality.

Now let me say, secondly, that if we are to have peace in the world, men and nations must embrace the nonviolent affirmation that ends and means must cohere. One of the great philosophical debates of history has been over the whole question of means and ends. And there have always been those who argued that the end justifies the means, that the means really aren't important. The important thing is to get to the end, you see.

So, if you're seeking to develop a just society, they say, the important thing is to get there, and the means are really unimportant; any means will do so long as they get you there — they may be violent, they may be untruthful means; they may even be unjust means to a just end. There have been those who have argued this throughout history. But we will never have peace in the world until men everywhere recognize that ends are not cut off from means, because the means represent the ideal in the making, and the end in process, and ultimately you can't reach good ends through evil means, because the means represent the seed and the end represents the tree.

It's one of the strangest things that all the great military geniuses of the world have talked about peace. The conquerors of old who came killing in pursuit of peace, Alexander, Julius Caesar, Charlemagne, and Napoleon, were akin in seeking a peaceful world order. If you will read Mein Kampf closely enough, you will discover that Hitler contended that everything he did in Germany was for peace. And the leaders of the world today talk eloquently about peace. Every time we drop our bombs in North Vietnam, President Johnson talks eloquently about peace. What is the problem? They are talking about peace as a distant goal, as an end we seek, but one day we must come to see that peace is not merely a distant goal we seek, but that it is a means by which we arrive at that goal. We must pursue peaceful ends through peaceful means. All of this is saying that, in the final analysis, means and ends must cohere because the end is preexistent in the means, and ultimately destructive means cannot bring about constructive ends.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with his daughter Bernice (Bonnie) at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia in 1967.

(Benedict J. Fernandez / The King CenterAll rights reserved.)
Now let me say that the next thing we must be concerned about if we are to have peace on earth and goodwill toward men is the nonviolent affirmation of the sacredness of all human life. Every man is somebody because he is a child of God. And so when we say "Thou shalt not kill," we're really saying that human life is too sacred to be taken on the battlefields of the world. Man is more than a tiny vagary of whirling electrons or a wisp of smoke from a limitless smoldering. Man is a child of God, made in His image, and therefore must be respected as such. Until men see this everywhere, until nations see this everywhere, we will be fighting wars. One day somebody should remind us that, even though there may be political and ideological differences between us, the Vietnamese are our brothers, the Russians are our brothers, the Chinese are our brothers; and one day we've got to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. But in Christ there is neither Jew nor Gentile. In Christ there is neither male nor female. In Christ there is neither Communist nor capitalist. In Christ, somehow, there is neither bound nor free. We are all one in Christ Jesus. And when we truly believe in the sacredness of human personality, we won't exploit people, we won't trample over people with the iron feet of oppression, we won't kill anybody.

There are three words for "love" in the Greek New Testament; one is the word eros. Eros is a sort of esthetic, romantic love. Plato used to talk about it a great deal in his dialogues, the yearning of the soul for the realm of the divine. And there is and can always be something beautiful about eros, even in its expressions of romance. Some of the most beautiful love in all of the world has been expressed this way.

Then the Greek language talks about philos, which is another word for love, and philos is a kind of intimate love between personal friends. This is the kind of love you have for those people that you get along with well, and those whom you like on this level you love because you are loved.

Then the Greek language has another word for love, and that is the word agape. Agape is more than romantic love, it is more than friendship. Agape is understanding, creative, redemptive good will toward all men. Agape is an overflowing love which seeks nothing in return. Theologians would say that it is the love of God operating in the human heart. When you rise to love on this level, you love all men not because you like them, not because their ways appeal to you, but you love them because God loves them. This is what Jesus meant when he said, "Love your enemies." And I'm happy that he didn't say, "Like your enemies," because there are some people that I find it pretty difficult to like. Liking is an affectionate emotion, and I can't like anybody who would bomb my home. I can't like anybody who would exploit me. I can't like anybody who would trample over me with injustices. I can't like them. I can't like anybody who threatens to kill me day in and day out. But Jesus reminds us that love is greater than liking. Love is understanding, creative, redemptive goodwill toward all men. And I think this is where we are, as a people, in our struggle for racial justice. We can't ever give up. We must work passionately and unrelentingly for first-class citizenship. We must never let up in our determination to remove every vestige of segregation and discrimination from our nation, but we shall not in the process relinquish our privilege to love.

I've seen too much hate to want to hate, myself, and I've seen hate on the faces of too many sheriffs, too many white citizens' councilors, and too many Klansmen of the South to want to hate, myself; and every time I see it, I say to myself, hate is too great a burden to bear. Somehow we must be able to stand up before our most bitter opponents and say:

"We shall match your capacity to inflict suffering by our capacity to endure suffering. We will meet your physical force with soul force. Do to us what you will and we will still love you. We cannot in all good conscience obey your unjust laws and abide by the unjust system, because noncooperation with evil is as much a moral obligation as is cooperation with good, and so throw us in jail and we will still love you. Bomb our homes and threaten our children, and, as difficult as it is, we will still love you. Send your hooded perpetrators of violence into our communities at the midnight hour and drag us out on some wayside road and leave us half-dead as you beat us, and we will still love you. Send your propaganda agents around the country, and make it appear that we are not fit, culturally and otherwise, for integration, and we'll still love you. But be assured that we'll wear you down by our capacity to suffer, and one day we will win our freedom. We will not only win freedom for ourselves; we will so appeal to your heart and conscience that we will win you in the process, and our victory will be a double victory."

If there is to be peace on earth and goodwill toward men, we must finally believe in the ultimate morality of the universe, and believe that all reality hinges on moral foundations. Something must remind us of this as we once again stand in the Christmas season and think of the Easter season simultaneously, for the two somehow go together. Christ came to show us the way. Men love darkness rather than the light, and they crucified Him, and there on Good Friday on the Cross it was still dark, but then Easter came, and Easter is an eternal reminder of the fact that the truth-crushed earth will rise again. Easter justifies Carlyle in saying, "No lie can live forever." And so this is our faith, as we continue to hope for peace on earth and goodwill toward men: let us know that in the process we have cosmic companionship.

In 1963, on a sweltering August afternoon, we stood in Washington, D.C., and talked to the nation about many things. Toward the end of that afternoon, I tried to talk to the nation about a dream that I had had, and I must confess to you today that not long after talking about that dream I started seeing it turn into a nightmare. I remember the first time I saw that dream turn into a nightmare, just a few weeks after I had talked about it. It was when four beautiful, unoffending, innocent Negro girls were murdered in a church in Birmingham, Alabama. I watched that dream turn into a nightmare as I moved through the ghettos of the nation and saw my black brothers and sisters perishing on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity, and saw the nation doing nothing to grapple with the Negroes' problem of poverty. I saw that dream turn into a nightmare as I watched my black brothers and sisters in the midst of anger and understandable outrage, in the midst of their hurt, in the midst of their disappointment, turn to misguided riots to try to solve that problem. I saw that dream turn into a nightmare as I watched the war in Vietnam escalating, and as I saw so-called military advisors, 16,000 strong, turn into fighting soldiers until today over 500,000 American boys are fighting on Asian soil. Yes, I am personally the victim of deferred dreams, of blasted hopes, but in spite of that I close today by saying I still have a dream, because, you know, you can't give up in life. If you lose hope, somehow you lose that vitality that keeps life moving, you lose that courage to be, that quality that helps you go on in spite of all. And so today I still have a dream.

I have a dream that one day men will rise up and come to see that they are made to live together as brothers. I still have a dream this morning that one day every Negro in this country, every colored person in the world, will be judged on the basis of the content of his character rather than the color of his skin, and every man will respect the dignity and worth of human personality. I still have a dream that one day the idle industries of Appalachia will be revitalized, and the empty stomachs of Mississippi will be filled, and brotherhood will be more than a few words at the end of a prayer, but rather the first order of business on every legislative agenda. I still have a dream today that one day justice will roll down like water, and righteousness like a mighty stream. I still have a dream today that in all of our state houses and city halls men will be elected to go there who will do justly and love mercy and walk humbly with their God. I still have a dream today that one day war will come to an end, that men will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks, that nations will no longer rise up against nations, neither will they study war any more. I still have a dream today that one day the lamb and the lion will lie down together and every man will sit under his own vine and fig tree and none shall be afraid. I still have a dream today that one day every valley shall be exalted and every mountain and hill will be made low, the rough places will be made smooth and the crooked places straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. I still have a dream that with this faith we will be able to adjourn the councils of despair and bring new light into the dark chambers of pessimism. With this faith we will be able to speed up the day when there will be peace on earth and goodwill toward men. It will be a glorious day, the morning stars will sing together, and the sons of God will shout for joy.

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Trent Gilliss

is the cofounder of On Being / KTPP and currently serves as chief content officer and executive editor. He received a Peabody Award in 2007 for his work on "The Ecstatic Faith of Rumi" and garnered two Webby Awards (in 2005, and again in 2008). The Online News Association nominated his journalistic work multiple times in the general excellence and outstanding specialty journalism categories. Trent's reported and produced stories from Turkey to rural Alabama, from Israel and the West Bank to Cambridge, England.

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Reflections

This speech should be read from every pulpit this Sunday. It is profound. It shows the true message of a universal faith -- of morality that transcends time, space, faith, and human folly.

Thank you for shairng

Amen. Amen.

How powerful and beautiful and prophetic. I wonder why this sermon is not as well known as other sermons and speeches of Dr. King's are. I hope many will read it.

I reviled this man 30 years ago. I miss him so now. There is NO voice in the world as his. None. Which isn't fair on Brian McLaren for example, but Brian, who honours Dr. King, would be the first to admit it. I mourn Dr. King. On my computer desktop for years now I have Robert Kennedy's paraphrase from Aeschylus' Agamemnon on his death: “In our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God.”. When looking at the ghastly, uncomfortably numbing world I remember Dr. King's words, from memory: 'The arc of the moral universe is long, but it tends towards justice.'. I checked, and it's 'bends'. How long, Oh Lord? How long?

Great words of wisdom that are so true for today.

Thank you for making me aware of this message from MLK. What first occurred to me: His voice is Jesus' voice.

Thank you for this powerful tonic as we embark on another year of global strife on all levels of society. As I read Dr King's words, I hear them in his memorable voice. How we need him with us now, and this sermon helps to reawaken the Dream that he never forsook. Have shared this in the hope that those least likely to encounter it may feel its effects by means of interpersonal osmosis ... we must keep the hope vibrant, no matter what.

Alleluia, for He has spoken and His truth reigns and lives in this sermon that our dear Reverend Martin penned to paper on the last Christmas he celebrated here on Earth. I offer a prayer of thanksgiving to all of Martin's friends, family, and supporters for bearing witness to His truth, which indeed has been a heavy, heavy cross to bear. May we all continue to create a world of good will and universal brotherhood and sisterhood that the Reverend himself never gave up on. It's all we have. Peace be with you!

Wonderful, amazing !!

The United Nations should use this as a road map to unity. The speech has a very important place at today's table . It is the true Christmas message. Thank you for bringing it to our attention. But it needs to remain in our view. MLK day next month...

I wish that this dream come true, that man can be a brother to man and woman and children. That we will not be afraid anymore. Bless you all and thank you for sharing.
CF

This should be used in history and economics classes once a semester. With an assigned reflection paper relative to the current time period.

Can peace start with an individuals example? Must there be an action that goes with example? Is a simple hug, a smile, an open heart and mind, caring for everyone no matter their place in life or where they come from. How do I, you anybody embrace those who would shame, hurt destroy others. Where in the depth of my soul do I find room for hatred and greed and how do I respond to what I cannot change? I'm not so naïve to think I can solve all of our world injustices but I must believe that I must try to do what I alone can do and just maybe we as the human race will be stronger that the evil that exists.

My deep deep gratitude to you, Trend Gillis for this amazing piece of the teachings and wisdom of Martin Luther King,Jr.!
I only just now have been reading it for the very first time,a month after Christmas!
Every Christmas Eve I reread the letter of Dietrich Bonhoeffer to his beloved Maria from prison,written in 1943.
I was a child then,6 years old.

This sermon I now will share wherever I can .
I can hardly believe that I only today have decided to read this sermon!
I am so very deeply moved by it,and will reread it now also every Christmas that I have left.
And I will share it with all my grandchildren .
Every Blessing to you as this new year moves forward.
And again,thank you for all the work you do on Krista,s On Being!
J.A.

What vast, harrowing power in these words. Thank you, Martin! Thank you Trent, Krista, and team.

Good news: the spirit of MLK, the spirit of Christ is sparklingly alive in this generation. I teach music at a charter school north of Boston, and we spent the past week singing "We Shall Overcome." One class spontaneously changed the words from "We shall overcome someday" to "We shall overcome TODAY," so we kept it that way.

The students spoke intensely of all they want to overcome, as individuals and as a planet: poverty, hunger, racism, sexism, educational inequality, cruelty to animals, their own nightmares of being kidnapped or seeing a loved one harmed.

They shared their dreams, too. A fifth grade boy wants to build a skate park where all people can come together to have fun, whether they're rich or poor. A second grade girl's eyes shone as she exclaimed, "I want to be a princess who brings peace on earth!" I've never been a huge fan of pushing princess stories, but it occurred to me for the first time that first-world children are very much like princes and princesses by global/historical standards. If I'm teaching royalty, then may these kids grow up to be queens of justice and kings of peace.

The kids created their own verses to "We Shall Overcome," far more powerful than anything I could have come up with:

We can learn to be friends
We can shine together
We'll find peace on earth
Nothing can take our hearts away
Nothing can stop us now!

Amen and amen. For the first time this year, I felt more hopeful than heartbroken as I honored MLK day. The man has passed over the threshold, but his work here continues.

The world we should live...Amen

Es hermoso como algunos pastores evangélicos, hermanos y hermanas en Cristo Jesús hablan, predican y sufren por la justicia social. Evidenciado que las bienaventuranzas son precisamente para transformar la sociedad y no para ver de manera subjetiva nuestra realidad social. A pesar de que soy guatemalteco, siempre escuche del pastor Vernon John y de Martin Luther King, así como de la señorita Rosa Park, de ella supe de su lucha ciudadana cuando ya era sociólogo graduado. Como hombre cristiano evangélico, tengo que seguir en la lucha por la justicia social y la predicación de Cristo Jesús para multiplicar su sabiduría no de forma aparente, sino con un discurso real y evidente ante las necesidades de la sociedad en su conjunto.