On Being Blog

Tuesday, July 21, 2009 - 09:51

Trent Gilliss, online editor

Producers and reporters from American Public Media (SOF/Marketplace/American RadioWorks) are gathering to discuss collective climate change reporting. I will be tweeting ideas and following the comments section here.

What’s the story we want to tell, and how do we want to tell it? I’m glad to bring your suggestions into the large and small group discussions. Please help as we’re planning shows for the coming year — leading up to and following on the heels of Copenhagen conference in December.

Monday, July 20, 2009 - 11:26

With the Pope Benedict XVI’s release of his third encyclical, Caritas in Veritate, Nancy wondered if we should do a short post pointing to Laurie Goodstein and Rachel Donadio’s article in The New York Times or the press release issued by the Vatican. I recommended we hold off and suggested that perhaps Martin Marty might weigh in Monday’s issue of Sightings from the Martin Marty Center at the University of Chicago Divinity School.

It never came, but last Thursday Rick Elgendy, a doctoral candidate in Theology, took the reins. His piece is smart and helpful, giving us perspectives from several sides and some historical context for this social treatise. We reprint it here for you:

Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 15:20

The Supreme Court candidate shares the impact of television on her life as a prosecutor to the U.S. Senate.

Thursday, July 16, 2009 - 13:19

Krista makes a promise an editor aims to keep.

Wednesday, July 15, 2009 - 15:15

The production staff's take on the "assignment" of watching lots of TV for the last TV show with Diane Winston.

Tuesday, July 14, 2009 - 12:47

The executive producer of Battlestar Galactica speaks to Winston's students about the religious influences embedded in the original 1978 version, including Mormon theology, numerology, and the signs of the zodiac.

Saturday, July 11, 2009 - 10:41

Why we decided to interview Chris Farrell for this show.

Friday, July 10, 2009 - 15:42

Studying neuroscience brings new insight to a mother's bond with her child.

Thursday, July 2, 2009 - 11:46

Are concert-goers the pilgrims of our time?

Sunday, June 28, 2009 - 09:13

When we value the mindfulness and intellectual rigor in all kinds of work — including manual forms of labor — what do we learn about ourselves? A reflection on appreciating labor in its many forms.

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