Nadia Bolz-Weber Talks Tattoos, Resurrection, and God's Disruption (video)

Sunday, September 8, 2013 - 4:50am
Nadia Bolz-Weber Talks Tattoos, Resurrection, and God's Disruption (video)

Every so often, Krista's interviews should be seen as much as heard. Her conversation with Nadia Bolz-Weber is one of these essential moments.

Post by:
Trent Gilliss (@TrentGilliss),  Executive Editor / Chief Content Officer for On Being
Shortened URL
38 ReflectionsRead/Add Yours

"That's kind of creepy."

That was Nadia Bolz-Weber's off-the-cuff, comic response to Krista telling the tattooed Lutheran pastor that she's been following her for quite some time. Every so often, Krista's interviews should be seen as much as heard. Her conversation with Nadia Bolz-Weber is one of these essential moments. (Yes, I'm biased.)

Their energy is dynamic. The enthusiasm of the crowd, palpable. Humor and laughter fills the big-top tent and infuses the conversation. And, it's what didn't make it into the produced podcast that shouldn't be missed: an interruption, a disruption that usually is an event-killer. But, somehow, in the context of the Wild Goose Festival, it became a moment of opportunity and community bonding together through communal song. What's the song? Watch and see... and sing along.

This August our production crew traveled to the gorgeous Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. We arranged a series of interviews with many great thinkers, including the Indigo Girls, Brian McLaren, and other folks we've had on our "big list" of guests. Nadia Bolz-Weber was also one of them. She's the pastor of the House for All Sinners and Saints in Denver, a church where a chocolate fountain, a blessing of the bicycles, and serious liturgy come together. She's a face of the Emerging Church. She's redefining what church is, with deep reverence for tradition.

This is the unedited, unabridged version of their interview, recorded with a live audience at the Wild Goose Festival in Hot Springs, North Carolina. And it's not to be missed.

Shortened URL

Trent Gilliss is the driving editorial and creative force behind On Being. He received a Peabody Award in 2007 for his work on "The Ecstatic Faith of Rumi" and garnered two Webby Awards (in 2005, and again in 2008). The Online News Association nominated his journalistic work multiple times in the general excellence and outstanding specialty journalism categories. Trent's reported and produced stories from Turkey to rural Alabama, from Israel and the West Bank to Cambridge, England.

Add Your Reflection

Filtered HTML

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd><span><div><img><!-->
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Embed content by wrapping a supported URL in [embed] … [/embed].

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
38Reflections

WishI could hear it, alas no play.
Can the transcript be posted, please?

Trent Gilliss's picture

The video won't work for you, Deborah? I'd hate for you to miss it because of a technical malfunction. Here's a transcript of the produced podcast, if this might be of help: http://www.onbeing.org/program/nadia-bolz-weber-on-seeing-the-underside-...

This one wouldn't open. Maybe that's a message.....

Sadly, the link doesn't work for me either. I heard the podcast, but wanted to see it also.

I went to Vimeo and searched for it. http://vimeo.com/73913123 should work

Thanks, Mike, as that Vimeo link worked.

Thanks!

This link works, thank you!!

I can't get the video to play, either. I thought there may be a problem with my browser, so I tried another browser. Still no luck. Maybe it's a problem on your end, Trent.

Woke up hearing the interview on the radio this morning, came here and watched the whole video. Great stuff.

People like Nadia Bolz-Weber help me not to despair about Christianity. Thanks.

Pages

Top Blog Posts

With the dulcet tones of the Copenhagen Phil, commuters find a moment of unexpected musical joy in this flash mob scene. You will too.
A worthy week filled with viral videos that will make you rethink your use of language and make you smile, and posts about a writer's prayer journal and a poem from Rumi that will inspire you.
At our darkest hours, when light fails to find a home, a path of buttercups may lead us back. Parker Palmer offers up thoughts and a Willow Harth poem for many of us caught "underground."
Parker Palmer reflects on "sharing our loves and doubts" as way into more generous conversations — all through the lens of a poem by Yehuda Amichai.
When a millennial woman hears about Buddhist teachings on overcoming anger through love, she decides to try out a meditation practice experiment on her own social media feeds.