Hubble Telescope's Ultra Deep Slice of Heaven (video)

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 - 2:50pm
Hubble Telescope's Ultra Deep Slice of Heaven (video)

A video that will inspire you to think more deeply about your place in the universe.

Post by:
Trent Gilliss (@TrentGilliss),  Head of Content / Executive Editor for On Being
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Space. Patches of complete black, void of light. We see nothing. And yet, our species peers more deeply and seeks for what it cannot see. Our curiosity is a springboard, a launching pad for that leap of faith into the unknown.

So, what did we do. We committed, and we pointed the Hubble Space Telescope at one of those dark patches in 1996. The result: one of the most important images ever taken. Where we saw nothing, there were galaxies — more than 3,000 of them. And when we looked more deeply, our field of view expanded to more than 100 billion galaxies.

Our vision of ourselves is forever changed now. The unfathomable depth of the universe adds to our sense of awe and wonder. We derive new meaning from the expanding context ushered forth by these Hubble images. The questions about the intersection of science and religion are changing, and the soil is richer and more fertile than ever before for making sense of our place in it all.

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Trent Gilliss is the driving editorial and creative force behind On Being. He received a Peabody Award in 2007 for his work on "The Ecstatic Faith of Rumi" and garnered two Webby Awards (in 2005, and again in 2008). The Online News Association nominated his journalistic work multiple times in the general excellence and outstanding specialty journalism categories. Trent's reported and produced stories from Turkey to rural Alabama, from Israel and the West Bank to Cambridge, England.

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10Reflections

You are right, Trent, that is inpiring! I'm now going to email it to lots of folks. Thanks for sharing!

Trent Gilliss's picture

Most welcome, MC.

I have long been a regular listener to Speaking of Faith and On Being, but I have only just added the news letter to my routine reading. What great thoughts are there. It takes a whole week or more to investigate each part and give it proper thought and meditation. Thanks so much for "Being."

Trent Gilliss's picture

Hannah, so glad that you are reading. Writing the newsletter is a lot of fun to share. I'm happy to read you're enjoying it!

Thank you for this! There is also a series called "How the Universe Works" that is on Netflix that is like this to me. It inspires such a sense of awe and wonder over what is so real and true but beyond what I can see with my eyes.
This is so wonderful, Thank you.

I have found no one who can build me a blade of grass from scrach !

I am speechless and in total awe. It's a beautiful thing! Thank you!

I, too, am speechless. It is so much to try to comprehend. I am daily in awe of this beautiful and fruitful Earth on which we live, but the totality of our seemingly unending Universe continues to stagger the imagination! O M G !!! Thank you, thank you, thank you.

Deepastronomy.com seems to be inactive since 2012. Is it Kaput? oo bad, it's a great site.

Endlessly fascinating!! But, what intrigues me most is how closely the filaments and cosmic structures at the outer reaches of the universe resemble our own web of bodily neurons and nerve filaments and pathways.

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