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“I am from”

Someone submitted this unfinished phrase for a potential guest post. Rather than discard the entry, let’s use this incomplete line as an opportunity to share and learn about each other, have a little fun on this Friday before the holiday weekend, and get creative!

Here are the guidelines: answer it any way you like. If you want to build on this phrase in prose — with one word, one sentence, one paragraph, one essay, then do so. If you want to finish this phrase with a photo or a photo essay, then do it. If you want to elaborate on this phrase with a line of poesy or a stanza, then do so.

Share something about yourself, your heritage, your geography, your interior mind, your imaginings or vulnerabilities. I’ll be featuring some of the most intriguing and creative ones from the comment section to this post in the coming days.


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1 Comments

The use of this phrase as a prompt or frame for the writing of a poem is widespread in schools. The original poem which inspired this exercise is “Where I’m From,” by George Ella Lyon, posted to the web at 
http://www.georgeellalyon.com/...

Many lessons based on this prompt have been based on Linda Christensen's article, "Where I'm From: Inviting Students' Lives into the Classroom" from Rethinking Our Classrooms: Teaching for Equity and Justice. Volume 2.
Authors:Bigelow, Bill, Ed.; Harvey, Brenda, Ed.; Karp, Stan, Ed.; Miller, Larry, Ed.

Just to provide some context...

Cheers, Fred