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Lately we’ve been playing around with radio promos and the top of the show, foregoing our regular theme music because it just doesn’t quite work for us, editorially speaking. And, this point was demonstrated while producing our recent show with Martin Rees.

So, Chris Heagle, our technical director went to work. I think playful best describes his reworking of the top with Krista reading script. Non? Does the Star Trek theme ever get old?


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4 Comments

That music stops me in my tracks whenever I hear it.  It takes me back to being an optimist again.

Great musical choice!

It is common to fold using a flat surface but some folders like doing it
in the air with no tools especially when displaying the folding. Many
folders believe no tool should be used when folding. However a couple of
tools can help especially with the more complex models. For instance a bone folder allows sharp creases to be made in the paper easily, paper clips can act as extra pairs of fingers, and tweezers can be used to make small folds. When making complex models from origami crease patterns, it can help to use a ruler and ballpoint embosser
to score the creases. Completed models can be sprayed so they keep
their shape better, and of course a spray is needed when wet folding.

This branch of origami is one that has grown in popularity recently. A tessellation
is a collection of figures filling a plane with no gaps or overlaps. In
origami tessellations, pleats are used to connect molecules such as
twist folds together in a repeating fashion.