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@ths1104, from The Internet Wishlist

An image of wooden prayer tablets in Japan made me think of this virtual suggestion box, of sorts, where people can petition their “prayers” for the future of technology. The quotation above was one of those submissions, which I liked because it suggests using technology to serve and connect.

The Internet Wishlist creates a space for people to share the holes and needs in their complex lives where apps and websites could do them some good. Start-ups and developers, pay attention to these missives! The pedestrian longings of today could lead to the technological advances of the future.

If you’ve got an idea to contribute, simply post your idea on Twitter and include the hash tag #theiwl.


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4 Comments

I wish that people could take a mass-produced, cost-effective pill that would allow them to better digest cellulose, making more resources available as food and aiding in the fight against hunger.

I wish there was a way to wash out accumulated matter in the human lungs, reducing the risk of lung cancer and emphysema.

I wish for a truly democratic nation through technology, where every citizen may vote on every issue in real time through the use of personal computers.

My prayer is for those left behind as the world becomes more and more technology based. I have painful memories of beginning college at the age of 40 in 1995, feeling lost and left out during an orientation held in the university library for new students. The librarian simply assumed all of us knew how to turn on the computer, use the mouse and navigate to the university's library web page. A couple of years later as a project in a methods course, my classmates and I undertook a survey of returning students and found that I was in a shocking majority in what I tagged my first year "techno-intimidation."