(photo: Mike Rose)

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Selected Readings

"No Child Left Behind and the Spirit of Democratic Education"

—a chapter from Why School? Reclaiming Education for All of Us by Mike Rose

"You can prep kids for a certain kind of test, get a bump in scores, yet not be providing a very good education. The end result is the replication of a troubling pattern in American schooling: poor kids get an education of skills and routine, a lower-tier education, while students in more affluent districts get a robust course of study."

Selections from The Mind at Work

Mike rose describes the facilities his mother used as a waitress — remembering orders, balancing dishes, chatting with customers — and how she learned those skills.

Selections from Lives on the Boundary

Passages from Rose's book on the struggles and achievements of America's underprepared. He reflects on students' dreams of literacy, and the yearning to become a better version of one's self.

Pertinent Posts from the On Being Blog

A video that's so heartbreakingly gorgeous and unswerving in its emotional sway, it'll have you pondering your own station in life.

When we value the mindfulness and intellectual rigor in all kinds of work — including manual forms of labor — what do we learn about ourselves? A reflection on appreciating labor in its many forms.

"The skills gap is a reflection of what we value. To close the gap, we need to change the way the country feels about work." ~Mike Rowe

1

Training and employing unskilled laborers as apprentices and teaching "anyone with a work ethic" how to build.

We made a trip to a nearby historic eatery to gather sound for this program.

1

Krista is given a new appreciation for "the sidelines of my education."

Our guest rediscovers Studs' magic in his interview — discussing imaginative educators defying the odds.

About the Image

Rose Emily, our guest's mother, during her shift at Coffee Dan's, a once-famous landmark in downtown L.A. (circa 1953-54).

(photo: Mike Rose)

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I listened to Mike Rose's discussion on the meaning of intelligence. Mike Rose is an author and a professor. He talks about how he didn't do so well in school and his childhood experience with education. His scores got mixed up with another student and he was put in a college prep class when he wasn't able to understand the basic things he was already supposed to learn. He addressed the issue of how IQ tests don't necessarily determine intelligence truly. He uses the example of his mother being a waitress. She is able to memorize the customers orders, know everything that is going on in the restaurant, and serve everyone in a timely manner, etc. These many skills that she uses in her manual labor job aren't tested on the IQ tests and these skills are needed in life. Rose also addresses the "no child left behind" act. He states that its a good thing because many students are left behind by standardized school curriculums that don't address these students. The students he is referring to are the poor, minorities, and immigrants. This act ensures that these students are properly attended to and not left behind in the education system.

I agree with the points the Rose brings up because many of the students that don't succeed in school are the poor, minorities and mmigrants which is unfair to just leave these students behind because they aren't as advantaged as the students that succeed in school. I also agree that intelligence can't be based only on an IQ test because not every aspect of "intelligence" is measured on there such as memory, etc. With standardized education, I think many aspects can become lost. For example, immigrants and minorities can lose some of their culture by trying to conform to the US education system which has no room for their culture. I also believe that many aspects that are needed for labor jobs are lost because of the standardized education. Skills needed for labor jobs aren't being taught and instead skills needed for non labor and more higher up jobs are being taught such as chemistry, etc. I'm not saying that this is a bad thing I'm just pointing out how education has changed. IQ tests seem to measure aspects that are taught in school, but what about those who choose labor jobs? The IQ test doesn't measure the intelligence they have and therefore aren't so accurate. Overall, this podcast was great and made me think about the education system and measures of intelligence which I never really considered.

I listened to Mike Rose's discussion on the meaning of intelligence. Mike Rose is an author and a professor. He talks about how he didn't do so well in school and his childhood experience with education. His scores got mixed up with another student and he was put in a college prep class when he wasn't able to understand the basic things he was already supposed to learn. He addressed the issue of how IQ tests don't necessarily determine intelligence truly. He uses the example of his mother being a waitress. She is able to memorize the customers orders, know everything that is going on in the restaurant, and serve everyone in a timely manner, etc. These many skills that she uses in her manual labor job aren't tested on the IQ tests and these skills are needed in life. Rose also addresses the "no child left behind" act. He states that its a good thing because many students are left behind by standardized school curriculums that don't address these students. The students he is referring to are the poor, minorities, and immigrants. This act ensures that these students are properly attended to and not left behind in the education system.

I agree with the points the Rose brings up because many of the students that don't succeed in school are the poor, minorities and mmigrants which is unfair to just leave these students behind because they aren't as advantaged as the students that succeed in school. I also agree that intelligence can't be based only on an IQ test because not every aspect of "intelligence" is measured on there such as memory, etc. With standardized education, I think many aspects can become lost. For example, immigrants and minorities can lose some of their culture by trying to conform to the US education system which has no room for their culture. I also believe that many aspects that are needed for labor jobs are lost because of the standardized education. Skills needed for labor jobs aren't being taught and instead skills needed for non labor and more higher up jobs are being taught such as chemistry, etc. I'm not saying that this is a bad thing I'm just pointing out how education has changed. IQ tests seem to measure aspects that are taught in school, but what about those who choose labor jobs? The IQ test doesn't measure the intelligence they have and therefore aren't so accurate. Overall, this podcast was great and made me think about the education system and measures of intelligence which I never really considered.

I have mastering problems in addition to ended up being put rear from the thus known as "smart" type in 6 rank. It had been any devasting encounter, even though My spouse and i was not stunned. My spouse and i understood our numbers abilities had been quite fragile. My spouse and i evolved into the actual computer mouse button behind the actual class room for the majority of connected with our center school in addition to senior high school vocation. It had been just right after our new mother advocated to me to be able to be allowed to carry an consistently improves program in Humanties that we was handed the actual reward of any redefination connected with personal duct tapes creations. Sister Agnes Therese saw our likely in addition to known as me out there right after type. Your lover besides provided me an obvious in addition to honest assessment although spelled out her class room expectations to me -- no longer computer mouse button!

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is a professor in the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. He’s the author of several books, including The Mind at Work: Valuing the Intelligence of the American Worker, and Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves a Second Chance at Education.

Production Credits

Host/Producer: Krista Tippett

Senior Editor: Trent Gilliss

Senior Producer: David McGuire

Technical Director/Producer: Chris Heagle

Producer: Nancy Rosenbaum

Associate Producer/Online: Susan Leem

Coordinating Producer: Stefni Bell

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