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Trent Gilliss's picture

What if our lives were precious only up to a point? What if we held them loosely and understood that there were no guarantees? So that when you got sick, you weren’t a stage, but in a process.

What if our lives were precious only up to a point? What if we held them loosely and understood that there were no guarantees? So that when you got sick, you weren’t a stage, but in a process. And cancer, just like having your heart broken or getting a new job or going to school or a teacher? What if rather than being cast out and defined by some terminal category you were identified as someone in the middle of a transformation that could deepen your soul, open your heart and all the while even if and particularly when you were dying, you would be supported by and be part of a community? And what if each of these things were what we are waiting for?
Trent Gilliss's picture

This disease of being ‘busy’ (and let’s call it what it is, the dis-ease of being busy, when we are never at ease) is spiritually destructive to our health and wellbeing.

This disease of being ‘busy’ (and let’s call it what it is, the dis-ease of being busy, when we are never at ease) is spiritually destructive to our health and wellbeing. It saps our ability to be fully present with those we love the most in our families, and keeps us from forming the kind of community that we all so desperately crave. It doesn’t have to be this way.
Trent Gilliss's picture

The biggest gift you can give is to be absolutely present, and when you’re worrying about whether you’re hopeful or hopeless or pessimistic or optimistic, who cares? The main thing is that you’re showing up...

The biggest gift you can give is to be absolutely present, and when you’re worrying about whether you’re hopeful or hopeless or pessimistic or optimistic, who cares? The main thing is that you’re showing up, that you’re here and that you’re finding ever more capacity to love this world because it will not be healed without that. That was what is going to unleash our intelligence and our ingenuity and our solidarity for the healing of our world.
Trent Gilliss's picture

Memory is the scribe of the soul.

Memory is the scribe of the soul.
Trent Gilliss's picture

Everybody sees according to his particular history, according to his narrative. So what should be done? What should be done is we should find out from each other `What did you see?’

Everybody sees according to his particular history, according to his narrative. So what should be done? What should be done is we should find out from each other `What did you see?’ And when we gather together and form a collective kind of image, then you have a clearer picture as to what God is. So the mirror is one, but the reflections are many. The text is one, but the interpretations are many.
Trent Gilliss's picture

Trauma really does confront you with the best and the worst. You see the horrendous things that people do to each other, but you also see resiliency...

Trauma really does confront you with the best and the worst. You see the horrendous things that people do to each other, but you also see resiliency, the power of love, the power of caring, the power of commitment, the power of commitment to oneself, the knowledge that there are things that are larger than our individual survival. And in some ways, I don’t think you can appreciate the glory of life unless you also know the dark side of life.
Trent Gilliss's picture

There are no unsacred places, there are only sacred places and desecrated places.

There are no unsacred places, there are only sacred places and desecrated places.

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