Elliot Dorff and Luke Timothy Johnson —
Marriage, Family, and Divorce

American ideals and rituals of marriage, family, and divorce are infused with biblical messages. But what does the Bible really say, and how has it been taught across the centuries as the institution of marriage has changed dramatically and often? A rabbi and Christian theologian help us explore the nuances of Jewish and Christian teachings and reveal the striking practicality of Jewish tradition across the ages and the surprising ambiguities of the New Testament.

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Guests

is a rabbi, author, and Rector and Rector and Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the American Jewish University.

is R.W. Woodruff Professor of New Testament and Christian Origins in the Candler School of Theology at Emory University, and author of The Writings of the New Testament: An Interpretation.

Pertinent Posts

Martin Marty invites interfaith couples to reflect and tell their stories — and challenge the binary headlines.

Selected Audio

Other Segments

» "Gay Relationships" (mp3, 2:16)
In this unreleased clip, Elliot Dorff discusses current Torah interpretations relating to homosexuality and partnership.


» "Raising Family" (mp3, 2:49)
Here, Rabbi Dorff talks about the important role procreation plays in Jewish marriages.

About the Image

A couple gets married in the Eldridge Street Synagogue in New York City under a chuppah, or wedding canopy, which is used in all Orthodox and Conservative, and in some Reform, ceremonies. The chuppah suggests a royal canopy in which the couple are king and queen that day.

(Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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