Buddhism

Buddhism

I am not interested in playing Farmville with the girl who told me to get a nose job in sixth grade. And no matter how much I honor her humanity, I just can't imagine that changing.

Every moment of life invites us to open our eyes to what Howard Thurman calls "the growing edge" of life, and aspire to grow with it. As he says, nothing embodies the growing edge better than a newborn — or, I'd say, a very young child.

Eve Ensler has helped women all over the world tell the stories of their lives through the stories of their bodies. Her play, The Vagina Monologues, has become a global force in the face of violence against women and girls. But she herself also had a violent childhood. And it turns out that she herself was like so many of us western women, obsessed by our bodies and yet not inhabiting them — without even knowing we're not inhabiting them. Until she got cancer.

Two legendary teachers shine a Buddhist light on a classic Christian teaching: love of enemies. Robert Thurman and Sharon Salzberg are working together on how we relate to that which makes us feel embattled from without, and from within.

You might call Tami Simon a spiritual entrepreneur. She's built a successful multimedia publishing company with a mission to disseminate "spiritual wisdom" by diverse teachers and thinkers like Pema Chödrön and Eckhart Tolle, Daniel Goleman and Brené Brown. She offers compelling lessons on joining inner life with life in the workplace — and advice on spiritual practice with a mobile device.

A sneak preview of our upcoming show with Sounds True founder Tami Simon. Enjoy and share your favorites.

On this Mother's Day, in some odd way, I can think of no more fitting tribute than to listen to Ms. Boorstein reciting these lovely lines from Pablo Neruda.

Our weekly wrap-up with poetry and prose, stories of Easter dishes from afar and links to things we're reading in the news and blogging worlds!

To sketchnote Krista's conversation with the Dalai Lama's principal English translator requires many of the same qualities he embodies: attention, compassion, focus, humility, action. No small feat.

It's easy to feel overwhelmed by all the bad news and horrific pictures in the world. This is a form of empathy, Joan Halifax says, that works against us. The Zen abbot and medical anthropologist has bracing, nourishing thoughts on finding buoyancy rather than burnout in how we work, live, and care.

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