community

community

This week, Trent Gilliss asks how we might cover the papal process. And our capsule shares the many ways people are building the "beloved community" and how a rock band was inspired by a 20th-century Jewish philosopher. And we remember Rabbi David Hartman.

"Even if you like living alone, that doesn't always mean you want to be alone." ~Lisa Napoli

Each Friday night, the author and journalist opens her door and throws a "party" in her LA abode. Anybody can come and socialize. It's such a lovely idea and seems like a great way to build relationships and foster community in one's own way. Great idea!

This week's been one of those surprising times when so many people identified with Krista's Scrooge-like outlook on Christmas but add to the discussion by contributing to community.

By turning away from wanting things to valuing people, we can celebrate the holiday season through the eyes of a "beloved community" and ask what kind of community we can create together.

An illustration of Xavier Le Pichon’s analogies between the “rigidity” and what he calls “ductility” of the earth, and human communities he's witnessed from India to France.

How might we set up a website in which people could find political pen pals for civil, substantive conversations? Offer your suggestions and please share with others. They might have the answer!

A conversation about climate change and moral imagination with a leading environmentalist and writer who has been ahead of the curve on this issue since he wrote The End of Nature in 1989. We explore his evolving perspective on human responsibility in a changing natural world.

Sixteen Muslims, in their own words, speak about the delights and gravity of Islam's holiest month. Through vivid memories and light-hearted musings, they reveal the richness of Ramadan — as a period of intimacy, and of parties; of getting up when the world is quiet for breakfast and prayers with one's family; of breaking the fast every day after nightfall in celebration and prayers with friends and strangers.

As the global economic crisis began to unfold this past fall, we wanted to respond immediately, in our way. We began to conduct an online conversation parallel to but distinct from our culture's more sustained focus on economic scenarios. For in each of our lives, whoever we are, very personal scenarios are unfolding that confront us with core questions of what matters to us and what sustains us. We made a list of our guests across the years who we thought might speak to this in fresh and compelling ways.

Kate Braestrup is a chaplain to game wardens, often on search and rescue missions, in the wilds of Maine. She works, as she puts it, at hinges of human experience when lives alter unexpectedly — where loss, disaster, decency and beauty intertwine. Hear her wise and unusual take on life and death, lost and found.

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