Dalai Lama

Dalai Lama

Each week I write a weekly column that captures a tiny bit of what's beautiful and intriguing in this world. If you'd like to receive it in your email inbox, subscribe to our weekly newsletter!

My goodness, the beauty of it all. Gorgeous depth and colors, and composition in this photo from Romi Burianova. The larger viewing the better.

Joseph Campbell said,

"You must have a room, or a certain hour or so a day, where you don’t know what was in the newspapers that morning…a place where you can simply experience and bring forth what you are and what you might be."

In an era when much of what passes for "the news" is cartoonish or sheer lunacy, Joseph Campbell raises a question worth asking: Where can I get news that is true and worth attending to?

A short film, "Happy Life," elevates the everyday routines of ordinary people with the words of the Dalai Lama. A magical six minutes.

To sketchnote Krista's conversation with the Dalai Lama's principal English translator requires many of the same qualities he embodies: attention, compassion, focus, humility, action. No small feat.

"I was taught truth had to come from the 'correct' source. Otherwise, it was heresy. Yet there I was, hearing truth from a Muslim scholar, an Orthodox rabbi, an Episcopalian bishop, and the Dalai Lama himself." Who would have thought the Dalai Lama could make such a great running partner?

Krista Tippett Receives a Ceremonial Scarf from the Dalai LamaThe Dalai Lama presents Krista Tippett with a khata after their conversation at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. (photo: Cindy Brown)

Esoteric teachings on reincarnation and consciousness; simple teachings on compassion and ethics. Geshe Thupten Jinpa is a man who finishes the Dalai Lama’s English sentences. Meet this philosopher and former monk, now a husband and father of two daughters, and hear what happens when the ancient tradition embodied in the Dalai Lama meets science and life.

A renowned Tibetan Buddhist teacher shares his thoughts on the meaning of happiness, and how he understands spirituality as "contemplative science."

A few years ago, journalist Pankaj Mishra pursued the social relevance of the Buddha's thought across India and Europe, Afghanistan and America. He emerged with a startling critique of Western political economy that is even more resonant today as he pursued the social relevance of the Buddha's core questions: Do desiring and acquiring make us happy? Does large-scale political change really address human suffering?

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