democracy

democracy


"The joke that many Indians have about India is that there are too many gods, and the thing that we heard from Chinese is that there is not enough God in China."

As we Americans approach Independence Day — aka the Fourth of July — here's a modest proposal. How about adding an annual INTERdependence Day to remind us of something we seem in danger of forgetting: "We're all in this together!"

A society where that simple fact has been forgotten is not a society: it's a nightmare.

For the Fourth of July, a refreshing reality check about the long road of American democracy. We remember forgotten but fascinating, useful history as we contemplate how we might help young democracies on their own tumultuous paths now.

What might words like repentance or forgiveness mean, culturally, in this moment? These are questions of the emerging church, a loosely-defined movement that crosses generations, theologies and social ideologies in the hope of reimagining Christianity. With Phyllis Tickle and Vincent Harding, an honest and sometimes politically incorrect conversation on coming to terms with racial identity in the church and in the world.

With his "heart full to bursting," our lyrical friend and poet Yahia Lababidi sent me this short poem in response to the events happening in his native homeland of Egypt:

The most populous Muslim country in the world offers a lens into the complexity of sharia and why compassion may be at the core of its implementation.

There's a country between Europe's debt crisis and the Arab Spring, where democracy is valued and the economy is growing. It's Turkey. Mustafa Akyol gives a fresh perspective on this new model of religion and democracy.

54% of Egyptians see Turkey as an aspirational model for the role Islam should play in the Egyptian political system. A great piece detailing three things Turkey does right that a new Egyptian government could emulate.

Krista Tippett speaks with philosopher Jacob Needleman. As new democracies are struggling around the world, it’s easy to forget that U.S. democracy was shaped by trial and error. A conversation about the “inward work” of democracy — the conscience that shaped the American experiment.

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