Desmond Tutu

Desmond Tutu

The Nobel laureate shares this heart-wrenching story of flying on a plane out of Lagos, Nigeria and reveals his own psychological aftershocks of apartheid, even against his better instincts.

South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) held public sessions from 1996 to 1998, and concluded its work in 2004. In an attempt to rebuild its society without retribution, the Commission created a new model for grappling with a history of extreme violence. The basic premise of the Commission was that any individual, whatever he or she had done, was eligible for amnesty if they would fully disclose and confess their crimes.

Victims were invited to tell their stories and witness confessions. Through the TRC, many families finally came to know when and how their loved ones died. By the end of the hearings, the Commission took statements from more than 20,000 victims of Apartheid and received applications for amnesty from 7,100 perpetrators.

We explore the religious implications of truth and reconciliation with two people — one black, one white — who did the work of the Commission in charge of it.

"There's no question about the reality of evil, of injustice, of suffering, but at the center of this existence is a heart beating with love."

South African Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu on how his understanding of God and humanity has unfolded through the history he's lived and shaped.

Desmond Tutu has become a somewhat controversial figure in the global religious landscape by insisting that sexual orientation, like racial equality, is a basic human right.

A listener's story about a heinous crime reminds one of Desmond Tutu speaking about forgiveness during the South African truth and reconciliation process.

The Peabody Awards noted Craig Ferguson's interview with Desmond Tutu as making "late-night television safe again for ideas."

With a sly wit and a good deal of humor, Tutu ribs Krista about the apportionment of dried fruit. Listen in to this lively, playful exchange.