Detroit

Detroit

Veterans Day passes many of us without a turn of the head. Some of us get the day off work; others don't even know the national holiday is upon us. In many towns and cities across the U.S., women and men who served in foreign wars and peacekeeping efforts go unheralded in the public eye. Sure, we the media tell stories and personal narratives of the heroism and sacrifice they gave for the rest of us. But sometimes it feels gratuitous — or like no one truly cares.

By turning away from wanting things to valuing people, we can celebrate the holiday season through the eyes of a "beloved community" and ask what kind of community we can create together.

A massive art installation made with repurposed materials breathes new life into a deteriorating Detroit neighborhood.

Campus Martius Fountain in Detroit Kids play at the Campus Martius Fountain in Detroit. (photo: Maia C./Flickr, cc by-nc-nd 2.0)

Grace Lee Boggs Addresses a Full Hull House CrowdGrace Lee Boggs speaks at Hull-House in Chicago. (photo: David Schalliol)

We’re used to hearing about Detroit as a symbol of economic collapse. With the recent news coverage of city's financial crisis and declaration of bankruptcy, we travel to a city of vigor where joyful, passionate people are reimagining work, food, and the very meaning of humanity. The Chinese-American philosopher and civil rights legend Grace Lee Boggs is the heart and soul of this largely hidden story, which holds lessons for us all.

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