environment

environment

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where Nature may heal and cheer and give strength to body and soul alike."
—John Muir, from The Yosemite

These lyrical words from the great American conservationist are often cited, but what is far more interesting is the religious language he uses in the following paragraphs:

Disruption is around every corner by way of globally connected economies, inevitable superstorms, and technology’s endless reinvention. But most of us were born into a culture which aspired to solve all problems. How do we support people and create systems that know how to recover, persist, and even thrive in the face of change? Andrew Zolli introduces "resilience thinking," a new generation’s wisdom for a world of constant change.

"We're drying them out. But I'm looking closely — a lot of these pages, it's not reparable. This is just heartbreaking to look at."

Folks continue to gift us with picturesque images of their physical sanctuaries and healing spaces. The common themes? Home and nature.

A joyful lamentation over sealed spaces and the lessons Rosh Hashanah — and the High Holy Days — teaches when we have access to the gifts of our natural environment.

The lessons from the Green Patriarch's environmental summit in Turkey may not rest in facts and data, but in our religious traditions' knowledge that inspiring people to do what's best for the good of the whole.

A Twitterscript recap of our interview with the man who is trying to preserve the last quiet places.

Last month, conservative Christian leaders demanded that Richard Cizik be silenced or removed from his post. They charged that his concerns about climate change and torture have shifted attention away from moral issues such as gay marriage and abortion. But for Cizik, poverty, war, and the environment are moral issues too. We revisit Krista's 2006 conversation with Cizik that took many listeners by surprise.

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