By Sharon Salzberg November 23, 2015

What happens when our icons are turned to rubble? Would their meaning still hold? Drawing on the Hindu tradition of ishta devata, Sharon Salzberg contemplates the Paris attacks and the Syrian refugee crisis through her favorite icon, the Statue of Liberty.

By Mohammed Fairouz October 31, 2015

Civilizations elevate the best in cultures and people. A composer encourages us to rethink the phrase "clash of civilizations" and, by definition, civilization can only fuel human flourishing.

By Omid Safi October 15, 2015

Recent mass killings in Oregon and abroad inculcate a kind of fear that can be paralyzing. Through the lens of a Native American tale, Omid Safi refuses to feed those wolves and chooses to feed another wolf: love.

By Mohammed Fairouz July 25, 2015

For the world-weary, cynicism may feel safe. But, in our efforts toward self-protection, what might we be missing? A Millennial reflects on the doubt and distrust he sees in his generation, and suggests a courageous counterpoint: sincere and hopeful optimism.

By Trent Gilliss June 30, 2015

Our readers and our columnists explore Vincent Harding's question in light of the Charleston tragedy — and how we can reclaim our fears and our hopes in this great experiment. Plus, some things I've been reading this week (for your eyes only).

By Sharon Salzberg June 23, 2015

The fear inside us presents itself in the most unlikely and perhaps unexpected ways. But how do we engage that feeling and let go?

By Omid Safi March 05, 2015

So much can terrify us in the world today. Fear is a natural response. But the path of love, Omid Safi writes, is not the absence of fear but a notion made possible through vulnerability.

By Sherry K. Watt November 26, 2014

A powerful commentary from the mother of a black teenage son who says we need to stop talking around the edges of race and address the systemic problem itself: that we see black men as less than human.

By Parker J. Palmer August 06, 2014

Some good humor on forgetfulness and poignant verse from the poet Billy Collins to sweeten the swallow.

By Trent Gilliss November 18, 2013

In a 1919 letter to Gandhi, the Nobel laureate offers these words of advice on planting the seeds of intolerance.

April 07, 2013

Krista dishes on cooking with the BBC. We remember Roger Ebert's smile. And thoughts on fear and grieving, the coming spring, and a culture of advocacy.

February 23, 2013

Our weekly capsule of Krista Tippett's tweets, Instagram pairings, and strange bits of ephemera observed online.

April 20, 2010

In response to Speaking of Faith’s show about the brutality of regimes around the world and the question of the people who disappear — and their children — I thought I would share with you a scene from my childhood in Portugal during the country’s fascist regime that lasted for almost 40 years and ended in 1974.

I wake up in the middle of the night, as I often do, and walk slowly down the steps of the long staircase. I am eight years old. I come to join my father, who sits in his office listening to a small voice coming from a small radio. The sound is muffled; the words sound detached. I do not understand what it says.

He smiles at the sight of my face peering through the crack of the door.

“So, you’re up,” he says.