film

film

Each week I write a weekly column that captures a tiny bit of what's beautiful and intriguing in this world. If you'd like to receive it in your email inbox, subscribe to our weekly newsletter!

My goodness, the beauty of it all. Gorgeous depth and colors, and composition in this photo from Romi Burianova. The larger viewing the better.

So much of the wisdom shared by Robert Thurman and Sharon Salzberg has to do with the choices we make in our lives: the choice to forgive those that hurt us, the choice to forgive ourselves, and the choice that we make every day — to choose love over anger. Mr. Thurman gives a great analogy, comparing our ability to choose how we respond to anger to that of a TV remote; we can always choose to change the channel.

Choice is at the center of Alfonso Cuarón’s latest film, Gravity.

The film Life of Pi is not just a "parable of the postmodern quest for 'spiritual fulfillment'" but a meditation on beauty and our own finitude.

During the past decade, there has been an explosion of films and television programs containing religious and spiritual themes. Mel Gibson's The "Passion of the Christ" was only the tip of the iceberg. As new generations of Americans work out their spiritual and religious questions, they are increasingly turning to fantasy. We'll explore the deeper appeal of films like "Harry Potter" and "The Matrix," and we'll ask how fantasy in media reflects a changing spiritual imagination, especially in younger Americans.

Greenstreet's 2010 film 8: The Mormon Proposition takes a closer look at the LDS church's stance on gay marriage.

A smart film about the NYT photographer and seeing beauty in our everyday encounters.

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