history

history

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If our show site were a magazine, this would be the pull quote.

A testimony to the the power of MLK as a preacher and vulnerable human being — with moving audio of him as a man at his most vulnerable and his most poignant as a preacher.

The process of conserving The Jefferson Bible is interesting in its own right, and reading it is even more intriguing.

From one of Woody Guthrie’s journals dated January 31st, 1942, the great singer-songwriter reminds us that having a healthy dose of pragmatism with a pinch of humor is a wonderful way to approach each new year:

Our guest has grappled with large moral and religious questions on and off the page. We discover what she discerned -- in the act of creating a new universe -- about God and about dilemmas of evil, doubt, and free will. The ultimate moral of any life and any event, she believes, only shows itself across generations. And so the novelist, like God, she says, paints with the brush of time.

The idea of reciting an unchanging creed sounds suspicious to modern ears. But the late, great historian Jaroslav Pelikan illuminated ancient tradition in order to enliven faith in the present and the future. He insisted that strong statements of belief will be necessary if pluralism in the 21st century is to thrive. We take in his moving, provocative perspective on our enduring need for creeds.

A filmmaker and scholar gives us a parallel story to the ubiquitous news of China's economy and politics. Mayfair Yang discusses the ancient and reemerging traditions of reverence and ritual — revealing background to its approach to Tibet. And, she tells us how China gleaned some of its recent dismissive attitudes towards religion from the West.

Did you know that the ubiquitous slogan "Well-behaved women rarely make history" doesn't end with a period but a semicolon? Or that it comes from a Mormon feminist and Pulitzer Prize-winning historian?

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