identity

identity

I don't know anyone who'd recommend living "a divided life" — a life in which our words and actions conceal or even contradict truths we hold dear inwardly. And yet our culture counsels us to do exactly that:

In the first season Revolution, a television series about a post-apocalyptic Earth where electrical devices cannot function, Maggie Foster (played by Anna Lise Philips) carries a defunct cell phone in hopes that one day the power will return and she will be able see the photos stored within of her lost children. The cell phone becomes her fetish, dark and inactive, yet charged with emotion, memory, and anticipation.

For one of my classes I’m reading On the Incarnation by St. Athanasius of Alexandria. It’s interesting: contemporary with the Council of Nicaea it can be read as a kind of Christian manifesto on the meaning and purpose of the god-man, Jesus Christ.

As a convert to Islam, the discussion is personally relevant. It is in section 54 of this very book that I meet, once again, the epigram:

"I am who we are."

Anonymous

I heard this quoted at my nephews' charming elementary school in Castle Rock, Minnesota yesterday and have been turning the phrase in my mind ever since. Any immediate reflections come to mind as you ponder this saying?

In this photo essay, Joy Ladin reflects on how gender is a covenant she has broken "with others and a covenant with myself."

Gender defines us from the moment we’re born. But how is that related to the lifelong work of being at home in ourselves? For as far back as Joy Ladin can remember, her body didn’t match her soul. We explore this question through her story of transition from male to female — in an orthodox Jewish world.

A new generation of Asian-American poets are finding power of expression in slam poetry. For Bao Phi, it's the lifeblood of exploring his identity in America.

We are reimagining identity and difference in this century. Watch this video showcasing the love between parents and children grounded in the grit of experience.

"When we are able to freely share and inquire about each other’s religious and spiritual identities, it provides opportunities for collaboration, hospitality, and empowerment." ~Beth Katz

How one group in Omaha is trying to reshape our perspectives on identity, religion, spirituality, and culture through video portraits.

Harneel “Neel” Singh shares his experiences of being a Sikh student in the U.S. and wearing his patka.

Pages

apples