Islam

Islam

Gone are the days, writes Harvard's Ousmane Kane, when Islam in Sub-Saharan Africa was considered more peaceful and different than in other parts of the world.

The second installment in our sketchnotes series that teases out the highlights of Krista's conversation with an American Muslim activist making a difference in Chicago.

A globally admired voice of an emerging Muslim American dream. Rami Nashashibi uses graffiti, calligraphy, and hip hop in his work as a healing force on the South Side of Chicago. He's an activist who converges religious virtues, social action, and the arts. His life is a creative response to ethical confusion in a world of disparity.

Two hijab-wearing rappers dispel some misconceptions around gender + Islam while making music with a wide appeal.

As Latino Muslims grow in population, how do Americans make space in our minds for these new communities?

A Pakistani immigrant to the U.S. finds that stereotypes and misconceptions go both ways and is surprised to "see real examples of people living out tolerance, harmony and acceptance" in his new home.

"Although the Olympics have ended, the spirit of the Games should continue. Egyptians need to believe in a future that is inclusive and encompasses all citizens. That’s where sport comes in." ~Mustafa Abdelhalim

Egyptians shared interest in sports could be the bridge that unites its people and makes for a more inclusive society.

Listen to our tracks from this late-night Sufi jam session in a studio barely a block away from the tourist-filled Hippodrome and Hagia Sofia in Istanbul.

The second show from our recent trip to Istanbul. We meet a Dominican friar whose Christianity is inspired by the mystical tradition of Islam. And, an Eastern Orthodox bishop is creating what he calls a “dialogue of life” as a religious minority in this crucible of the ancient church.

“For me, this work is in part a way to deal with the anxiety, the spiritual anxiety of those disparities. I can’t feel religiously comfortable in simply accepting that type of division in the way we live our lives.” ~Rami Nashashibi
Nashashibi speaks about how he uses religion, art, and culture to fight for minority rights and social justice in conversation with Krista at Chautauqua.

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