music

music

BY May 05, 2012

"I think there are a lot of misconceptions in society in general about what actually brings happiness, we’re caught up in all these ideas that having a lot of money or having somebody beautiful to have sex with or having some cool objects, having a cool car, cool stereo or whatever is gonna make us happy."
—Adam Yauch

BY April 20, 2012

For the Lakota people, Cedric Good House of Standing Rock Reservation says, songs kept different memories and meanings alive. Sitting Bull sang the song above, Mr. Good House says, to remind his people of their way of living at a time when things looked most bleak — in what the history books describe as the "surrender" at Fort Buford.

BY April 15, 2012

The eleventh and final song to round out our Easter Sunday soundtrack for this year's Pascha won't leave your head. It's a chant by The Monastic Choir of the Valaam Monastery called "The Great Doxology." To those Orthodox Christians, Happy Pascha!

BY April 15, 2012

Number ten in our Orthodox Easter Sunday soundtrack is "Seven Magnificat Antiphons/O Weishit" — composed by Arvo Pärt. This track comes to you from the On Being playlist for "Restoring the Senses: Gardening and Orthodox Easter" with Vigen Guroian. It's exquisite.

BY April 15, 2012

The ninth song in our Orthodox Easter Sunday soundtrack comes from the Hover Chamber Choir of Armenia, "The Healing Bird." This track comes to you from the On Being playlist for "Restoring the Senses: Gardening and Orthodox Easter" with Vigen Guroian. Happy Pascha!

BY April 15, 2012

Continuing our string of sacred choral music songs of Armenia, a prayer to the patriarch titled “Hayrapetakan Maghan.” This track comes to you from the On Being playlist for “Restoring the Senses: Gardening and Orthodox Easter” with Vigen Guroian. Happy Pascha!

BY April 15, 2012

The seventh song in our Orthodox Easter Sunday soundtrack, a chant of crucifixion, is part of the sacred choral music tradition of Armenia: "Our Es Myer Im" meaning"Where are you, my mother." This track comes to you from the On Being playlist for "Restoring the Senses: Gardening and Orthodox Easter" with Vigen Guroian. Happy Pascha!

BY April 15, 2012

Number five in our Orthodox Easter Sunday soundtrack is ”Otche Nash (Our Father)” by the Russian composer of liturgical music Nikolai Kedrov, Sr.

BY April 15, 2012

For the first song in our Orthodox Easter Sunday soundtrack, "Alleluia, Behold the Bridegroom" by the St. Petersburg Chamber Choir.

BY March 31, 2012

A spectacular feat of engineering and creativity that you have to see to believe. And just guess what inspired its making. Just marvelous!

BY February 18, 2012

The singer and composer Meredith Monk is a kind of archeologist of the human voice. She's also an archeologist of the human soul, with a long-time Buddhist practice.

BY February 12, 2012

A joyful story on how bluegrass music brought together a country music star and klezmer virtuoso to record the classic 18th-century hymn, "The Lord Will Provide."

BY January 27, 2012

Photo by Mohamed Nanabhay. (Follow “onbeing” on instagram)

BY January 24, 2012

The beautiful world of Tumblr delivers a gem to the threshold of our blogging door with this marvelous rendition of a Pixies classic. And, telegrammarian couldn’t have described this piano music any better:

BY January 17, 2012

One of the stars in the constellation of Grace Lee Boggs' world of change is hip-hop artist Invincible, whom the Village Voice calls Detroit’s "femme-emcee extraordinaire." Invincible (aka Ilana Weaver) is a rapper and spoken word artist who leads workshops through the Boggs Center's Detroit Summer project.

In one of these workshops, she leads kids in collecting and studying interviews with community members. They use these conversations as the source for their own hip-hop pieces and brainstorm alternative solutions to the problems raised by their interviewees. She says this about her friendship with Grace Lee Boggs (whom you'll hear in our podcast this Thursday):

BY January 08, 2012

Krista reflects on her time with Rosanne Cash and our lives of poetry and mystery, of loss and love, of time travel.

BY January 06, 2012

There's a great story Rosanne Cash tells about her father Johnny Cash, and a special performance at Carnegie Hall in 1994. As we were producing this segment, we longed to hear the original. What did they sound like together? How did Johnny Cash introduce his daughter? How did the crowd respond? Well, we looked around for a copy, any copy of this special moment — but came up empty. That is, until we found a bootleg copy. A truly remarkable story.

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