Parker Palmer

Parker Palmer

Every moment of life invites us to open our eyes to what Howard Thurman calls "the growing edge" of life, and aspire to grow with it. As he says, nothing embodies the growing edge better than a newborn — or, I'd say, a very young child.

Joseph Campbell said,

"You must have a room, or a certain hour or so a day, where you don’t know what was in the newspapers that morning…a place where you can simply experience and bring forth what you are and what you might be."

In an era when much of what passes for "the news" is cartoonish or sheer lunacy, Joseph Campbell raises a question worth asking: Where can I get news that is true and worth attending to?

Hello! If you missed the most recent edition of my weekly On Being newsletter, here's the blog version to catch you up. A passage from Ralph Waldo Emerson taught us a new word, Parker Palmer and Lynn Ungar reminded us that work doesn't define you, a sweet mother/daughter yoga team made us smile, a lockpicker got us thinking about ethics, and so much more. If you'd like to receive it in your email inbox, sign up here.

"Camas Lilies," by Lynn Ungar, is one of my favorite poems. I posted it earlier this year — today I needed to read it again…

For me, writing is a miraculous process. It's as miraculous as Spring itself, when buds arise from frozen ground and greenery leafs out from wood that's hard and unyielding.

For 50 years I've been writing almost daily. I'm driven not by expertise but by my own bafflement about many things — some of them "in here" and some of them "out there." Every time I write, I'm surprised by what I discover about myself and/or the world.

In this program, we delve into uncomfortable religious and moral questions that the September 2001 terrorist attacks raised—questions of meaning that Americans have only begun to ponder one year later.

This hour also features the riveting first-person account of veteran public radio producer Marge Ostroushko, who captures elements of the religious life that grew up at and around Ground Zero and was largely hidden from news reporting. Her coverage, which you won't hear anywhere else, includes the ash-swirled final service, and an interview with the priest who coordinated the 24-hour team of clergy who blessed every human remain found there since 9/11.

One in ten Americans, and even more dramatically, about one in four women, will experience clinical depression at some point in their lives. We take an intimate look at the spiritual dimensions of this illness and its aftermath.

 

 

We explore human and spiritual aspects of economic downturn with a wise public intellectual of our time, the Quaker author and educator Parker Palmer. He works with people from all walks of life at the intersection of spiritual, professional, and social change, and stresses the need to acknowledge the inner life of human beings as a source of reality and power.

In his new book, Parker Palmer takes a deep and wise look at the loss of values that have impoverished American democracy and public life. He discusses healing the heart of democracy and the five habits necessary in moving forward. Our extended correspondence interview with the Quaker elder and educator.

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