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(5) Have no respect for the authority of others, for there are always contrary authorities to be found.


~Bertrand Russell, from his "Ten Commandments" of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Times op-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."

See Russell's Fourth Commandment.

(4) When you meet with opposition, even if it should be from your husband or your children, endeavor to overcome it by argument and not by authority, for a victory dependent upon authority is unreal and illusory.


~Bertrand Russell, from his "Ten Commandments" of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Timesop-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."

(3) Never try to discourage thinking for you are sure to succeed.


~Bertrand Russell, from his "Ten Commandments" of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Timesop-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."

(2) Do not think it worth while to proceed by concealing evidence, for the evidence is sure to come to light.


~Bertrand Russell, from his "Ten Commandments" of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Timesop-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."

See « Russell's First Commandment.

(1) Do not feel absolutely certain of anything.


~Bertrand Russell, from his "Ten Commandments" of the liberal outlook as it appears in his 1951 New York Times op-ed, "The Best Answer to Fanaticism—Liberalism."

"One of the greatest evils of the day among those outside the proximity of the suffering poor is their sense of futility. Young people say, 'What good can one person do?

"I am who we are."

Anonymous

I heard this quoted at my nephews' charming elementary school in Castle Rock, Minnesota yesterday and have been turning the phrase in my mind ever since. Any immediate reflections come to mind as you ponder this saying?

"This power of good must prove its truth and strength by its fearlessness, by its refusal to accept any imposition which depends for its success upon its power to produce frightfulness and is not ashamed to use its machines of destruction to terrorize a population completely disarmed. We must know that moral conquest does not consist in success, that failure does not deprive it of its dignity and worth.

“The most important thing in life is to learn how to give out love, and to let it come in. Let it come in. We think we don’t deserve love, we think if we let it in we’ll become too soft. But a wise man named Levin said it right. He said, 'Love is the only rational act.'"

— Mitch Albom, from Tuesdays with Morrie

"Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where Nature may heal and cheer and give strength to body and soul alike."
—John Muir, from The Yosemite

These lyrical words from the great American conservationist are often cited, but what is far more interesting is the religious language he uses in the following paragraphs:

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