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Every moment of life invites us to open our eyes to what Howard Thurman calls "the growing edge" of life, and aspire to grow with it. As he says, nothing embodies the growing edge better than a newborn — or, I'd say, a very young child.

Grace — a word of such command, and, yet, one seldom spoken today. Has the word fallen out of favor? Or has grace itself? And, if we aren’t talking about grace, does that mean we are not living it? Do we prefer to keep our distance from matters (or reminders) of a fall from grace?

It's hard to think of someone so beloved as American educator and television personality Fred Rogers (1928–2003). From 1968 to 2001 he hosted the children's television series Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. He was a lifelong advocate for the needs of children, even bringing his signature mix of clarity and compassion to the United States Senate when it was needed.

Who knew that we learn empathy, trust, irony, and problem solving through play — something the dictionary defines as "pleasurable and apparently purposeless activity." Dr. Stuart Brown suggests that the rough-and-tumble play of children actually prevents violent behavior, and that play can grow human talents and character across a lifetime. Play, as he studies it, is an indispensable part of being human.

What Adele Diamond is learning about the brain challenges basic assumptions in modern education. Her work is scientifically illustrating the educational power of things like play, sports, music, memorization and reflection. What nourishes the human spirit, the whole person, it turns out, also hones our minds.

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A guest contribution from a Christian Scientist on "Splitting Infinity" and the play's balanced depiction of his faith.

The 2010 World Cup final expects to draw 700 million viewers in a few hours. And with all the fanfare and elaborate ceremonies preceding this championship game, soccer at its core is a game of universal appeal and absolute simplicity. Nowhere is this more obvious than on the continent of Africa itself.

Improvisation as a method for mindfulness? A perspective from musician Anoushka Shankar.

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