politics

politics

TED's a tease. In early October, Sally Kohn gave, from what I can tell, one heck of a impassioned TED Talk, but it has yet to be released. We anxiously await it's liberation from the archives.

The most populous Muslim country in the world offers a lens into the complexity of sharia and why compassion may be at the core of its implementation.

On this Mother's Day weekend, a time to celebrate the women in our lives and be real about parenting. Along with art on happiness, brainstorming reactions, and emerging forms of spirituality in Ireland.

Vigorous discussions on what we're owed and what we earn, the slow work of healing, and stories of inspiration about being alone in this busy world.

An hour with the extraordinary humanity of Congressman John Lewis. The civil rights movement he helped animate was — as he tells it — love in action. He opens up the art and the discipline that made nonviolence work then — and that he offers up for our common life even today.

What better way to follow up our show with poet Elizabeth Alexander than to listen to the redemptive words of his second inaugural poet, Richard Blanco. A true pleasure.

A veteran Republican senator and Democratic economist are political bridge people who've brought differing approaches and shared love of country to generations of economic policy. In this tense political moment, they offer straight talk and wise perspective — and won’t let partisan gridlock have the last word. The final dialogue in our Civil Conversations Project.

In a fun, lively conversation with the comedian extraordinaire, Joanna Brooks discusses the fears, tensions, and survivalist instinct of Mormons of today. And Jon Stewart offers some advice on her "baby" religion growing up.

Given the U.S. media attention on both Mormonism and Islam of late, it is a worthwhile moment to note how much both groups have in common. Ask Mormon Girl Joanna Brooks and Tamarra Kemsley on what's at stake when goals of family and faith are the centering form of unity.

There's a country between Europe's debt crisis and the Arab Spring, where democracy is valued and the economy is growing. It's Turkey. Mustafa Akyol gives a fresh perspective on this new model of religion and democracy.

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