politics

politics

Here's a poem I re-read frequently. As short and simple as it is, it helps me remember that nothing new can grow between us when we speak to each other from "the place where we are right."

More important, the poem leads me to ask what I think is a question worth pondering: How might things change if we began our political conversations not from our certainties, but from our "doubts and loves"?

On November 29, 1981, a story in the Chicago Tribune proclaimed: “Hans Küng, one of the world’s most important religious figures, is hero for some and heretic to others.” Mr. Küng received coverage in the Trib because he had been invited to guest-teach at the University of Chicago Divinity School, two years after the Vatican has stripped him of his missio canonica, the license necessary to teach as a Roman Catholic theologian.

The surprising psychology behind morality is at the heart of social psychologist Jonathan Haidt’s research. “When it comes to moral judgments," he says, "we think we are scientists discovering the truth, but actually we are lawyers arguing for positions we arrived at by other means.” He explains “liberal” and “conservative” not narrowly or necessarily as political affiliations, but as personality types — ways of moving through the world. His own self-described “conservative-hating, religion-hating, secular liberal instincts” have been challenged by his own studies.

TED's a tease. In early October, Sally Kohn gave, from what I can tell, one heck of a impassioned TED Talk, but it has yet to be released. We anxiously await it's liberation from the archives.

The most populous Muslim country in the world offers a lens into the complexity of sharia and why compassion may be at the core of its implementation.

On this Mother's Day weekend, a time to celebrate the women in our lives and be real about parenting. Along with art on happiness, brainstorming reactions, and emerging forms of spirituality in Ireland.

Vigorous discussions on what we're owed and what we earn, the slow work of healing, and stories of inspiration about being alone in this busy world.

An hour with the extraordinary humanity of Congressman John Lewis. The civil rights movement he helped animate was — as he tells it — love in action. He opens up the art and the discipline that made nonviolence work then — and that he offers up for our common life even today.

What better way to follow up our show with poet Elizabeth Alexander than to listen to the redemptive words of his second inaugural poet, Richard Blanco. A true pleasure.

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