racism

racism

By Holly Haworth July 18, 2015

A Southern woman's searching lament on the hot, boiling silence of Southern grief after the shootings in Charleston — and the inheritance of sorrow.

By Omid Safi July 16, 2015

The recent success of Serena Williams and the U.S. women's soccer team in the World Cup is a beacon of light. It's also a reminder that we have a long way to go in recognizing the roles of half our population in sport and religion.

By Trent Gilliss June 30, 2015

Our readers and our columnists explore Vincent Harding's question in light of the Charleston tragedy — and how we can reclaim our fears and our hopes in this great experiment. Plus, some things I've been reading this week (for your eyes only).

By Courtney E. Martin June 26, 2015

A passionate, grounded plea to recognize white privilege and the gut level pushback — the "white fragility" — that happens when talking about race.

By Omid Safi June 25, 2015

We are in need of a new vision and visionaries who remind us not of the “greatness” of America, but of its goodness writes Omid Safi. A call for forgiveness, but one that's rooted in love and justice — and for an America that is yet to be.

By Paul Singleton, III June 20, 2015

The collective experiences of Black Americans can result in generational trauma that is "stored in the body." With the stories of McKinney, Texas and Charleston, South Carolina as a backdrop, a man calls for us to retrain our brains and break free from our limiting perceptions of one another to heal these divides.

By Omid Safi March 12, 2015

Fifty years since the historic march on Selma, Omid Safi calls for an inclusive justice for all people — and welcomes Muslim voices to be full democratic participants — so we can cross that bridge together.

By Omid Safi December 11, 2014

It’s not merely a sin-sick soul that is in need of profound redemption, writes our columnist, it is also our society and structural institutions that call out for being redeemed and transformed. A clear call to question, connect, and transform ourselves and our institutions.

By Trent Gilliss December 09, 2014

A letter from Einstein on the "Negro question" is rediscovered and essays on white privilege and the theology of Ferguson are complemented with ideas about opening up to hope and ourselves.

By Courtney E. Martin December 05, 2014

With the overwhelming angst of privilege, our columnist confesses to her own inclinations to participate in Twitter testimonies of white privilege. But, it's no substitute for the moral imagination required to acknowledge the emotional lives of others.

By Sherry K. Watt November 26, 2014

A powerful commentary from the mother of a black teenage son who says we need to stop talking around the edges of race and address the systemic problem itself: that we see black men as less than human.

By Omid Safi November 20, 2014

Three male Muslim leaders walk into an Amsterdam hotel to drop off their luggage, and they are presented with an unexpected question. How does one confront the the prejudice present in society today? Can it be confronted, or does it require face-to-face encounters?

By Courtney E. Martin August 15, 2014

Rather than merely expressing outrage at what happened in Ferguson, white Americans must show courage and own its part of the tragic story and the opportunity for transformation.

By Trent Gilliss January 18, 2014

As MLK Day approaches, a bit of creative inspiration infuses his iconic "I Have a Dream..." speech. Watch this video remix and be inspired.

By Trent Gilliss December 12, 2013

Watch a recording of our live video stream with Rev. Lucas Johnson and Dr. Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons at NPR headquarters in Washington, DC. The topic: nonviolence and how social change happens. A riveting hour story and substance.

October 18, 2012

During the first two presidential debates, Mitt Romney's Mormon faith has come up very little. But, as Joanna Brooks says, many Mormons continue to "white-knuckle" through this campaign season.

June 06, 2012

Will black Mormons vote for Romney or Obama? Guest contributor W. Paul Reeve offers a historical perspective of African Americans in the LDS Church -- and the decisions they must make in a pivotal election year.

December 20, 2011

A humorous, enjoyable speech peppered astute observations about the ways in which discussions about race and racism often devolve into matters of good and bad.

March 03, 2011

Rykestrasse Synagogue
The Rykestrasse synagogue in East Berlin survived “Kristallnacht” of 1938 and was the only functioning synagogue in former East Germany. (photo: Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

As we prepare to leave for Israel, I’m noting the strange and disturbing global outbreak of celebrity antisemitism: Charlie Sheen’s rant at his former producer; John Galliano’s rants at perfect strangers; and now a top boy band in Japan makes an appearance in Nazi garb.

February 02, 2011

A new radio doc untangles the little-told history of white Mississippians who tried to preserve segregation.

September 29, 2008

On Thursday night before the debate, I wrote something that meant a great deal to me. It was about a trip I made to Ole Miss in August and the incredible symbolism of that the debate on that campus, a cultural triumph it signified far larger than who won or lost.

The drama in financial markets nearly stopped the debate completely, and overshadowed a few hours of reflection we might have allowed ourselves on race. But Scott Simon did a lovely piece on Saturday morning, and Slate produced this: “Negro to Address Ole Miss Class” (The headline you won’t be reading about tonight’s presidential debate.) A white presidential candidate in civil debate against a black presidential candidate is a monumental, quiet victory of a milestone worth pondering, and celebrating, in a world in which bad news gets all the attention.


September 26, 2008

Our managing producer takes a sharp look at our journalistic profession's cultural appropriation of stereotypes in the political season.

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