science

science

BY September 30, 2009

A New York Times article features Adele Diamond's work the weekend before our interview.

BY September 17, 2009

Comments from two cosmologists and NASA's images from a refurbished Hubble.

BY August 30, 2009

Neil deGrasse Tyson is a name that’s been bandied about the office in the last several weeks as a potential guest. While scanning RSS feeds, one keys in on keywords one may not have paid attention to previously.

In this interview with The Humanist, the popular astrophysicist has some intriguing things to say about beliefs, education, and communication. When asked if he’s a humanist:

I’ve never identified with any movement. I just am what I am and occasionally a movement claims me because there is resonance between my writings and speeches and what they do, and that’s fine; I don’t mind that. But no, I have never been politically or organizationally active in that way. Astrophysics—that’s what I identify with.

On television and education (a la Winston?):

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BY August 27, 2009

A rap from an employee who works with the particle accelerator that actually does a really good job of breaking down the science.

BY August 13, 2009

Our SoundSeen slideshow of James Prosek's paintings of birds and fish, coupled with his words about the myth of order.

BY August 07, 2009

Visualizing responses to a Physics World survey on religion and science.

BY June 25, 2009

A follow-up question about altruism studies results in encore answer.

BY February 19, 2009

Video of a Seed salon with Janna Levin and fiction writer Jonathon Lethem.

BY December 08, 2008

A "scientist's scientist" on stress in tough economic times.

BY July 22, 2008

New Scientist’s headline “‘Ten Commandments’ of race and genetics issued” possibly falls into the overly-clever-but-unnecessary category of journalistic wordplay. They took the easy way out; ashamedly, it grabbed my attention.

Mapping the human genome has raised many ethical questions about choices — controversial issues ranging from designer babies to personal privacy rights. But, the issue of using this greater level of genetic detail as a basis for racial stereotypes and discriminatory policies, well, that’s a quieter issue that perhaps has more pervasive reprecussions.

Stereotypes, such as the native physicality of African-American athletes, may be born out by such data, but we may not be taking into account the cultural and social factors that contribute to these conclusions. Because the data may feed our preconceptions and appear to be logical, the scientific methodologies may not be scrutinized as critically as they could be.

BY May 21, 2008

The classic Eames Office video about the Powers of Ten is likened to a "a low budget 70s era educational filmstrip."

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BY March 19, 2008

Is math a basic need we intuit like hunger, thirst, and love?

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