BY January 03, 2012

A Presbyterian minister's favorite spiritual music comes not from the sanctuary or Sunday morning choir, but from Saturday night taverns with Patty Griffin, Jennifer Knapp, and Over the Rhine.

BY December 24, 2011

For one kid from the Bronx, the story of eating dates only on Christmas Eve takes on special meaning as told to him by his Polish grandmother.

BY November 23, 2011

Jenny Ward McDonald at Her Family Headstone

Last fall the idea to visit the family graveyard came to mind for the first time in ages. Día de Los Muertos seemed like the perfect excuse to make the journey. I allowed life and distance to keep me away, however, and I never went.

I am not Latina, but I did develop a strong appreciation for Mexican culture while studying midwifery on the Texas/Mexico border. When I moved home to Georgia, I kept a piece of Mexico in my heart. Since the first idea to celebrate my ancestors Mexican-style entered my mind last year, the urge had only grown stronger. So as November approached this year, I resolved to do it. I invited my two sisters. One said she’d bake a casserole and we planned to picnic at the cemetery. On October 31st, they both cancelled on me. I was determined, however, and went anyway.

BY November 06, 2011

Thailand - Ayuthaya 5 - Buddha headAn image of the Buddha is carved into a banyan tree at Wat Mahathat in Thailand. (photo: McKay Savage/Flickr, cc by 2.0)

The name Buddha means “awakened one.” This is the story of how a young man became the Buddha. As with all ancient tales, we can’t know what is to be taken literally and what is to be taken metaphorically. It doesn’t matter to me. I’m inspired by his story either way.

BY October 26, 2011

ZOMBIE WALK 2008A mass of people dress up for the Toronto Zombie Walk. (photo: Sam Javanrouh/Flickr, cc by-nc 2.0)

For some reason we’re experiencing a zombie moment. From zombie crawls across the globe to the record-breaking 11 million people who tuned in to watch the season premiere of AMC’s The Walking Dead, zombies are seemingly everywhere this season. Even sober institutions like The Centers for Disease Control are using zombies to teach us about disaster preparedness.

BY October 22, 2011
BY October 11, 2011

Every day is the anniversary of something. The date on the calendar ripples with other dates, other stories.

BY December 03, 2010

The DodecahedronMy favorite dog-earred, page-stained book growing up was The Phantom Tollbooth. I must have read over 40 times about Milo’s quest through the Kingdom of Wisdom to reconcile the rulers of Dictionopolis, the lover of words, and Digitopolis, the lover of numbers. The conclusion of this book, and of John Allen Paulos’ recent post in The New York Times, is that both language and math should reign equally.

Paulos, a mathematician and professor, argues that while narratives and statistics play important roles, people approach them both with different mindsets:

BY August 06, 2010

Do we throw our hands up in the air or be the hummingbird? An illustrated story told by Wangari Maathai.

BY June 24, 2010

Krista reflects on her conversation with Rabbi Sandy Sasso and the insight that "children can make the essence of religion come alive" and "may ultimately teach us far more than we teach them."

BY November 16, 2009

A reflection that life-altering moments are often informed through faith and a conviction and willingness to submit to that faith — setting aside a life of certainty and proceeding without a road map.

BY March 11, 2009

A poet reflects on the choices her family has made to live a simpler life in NYC.