television

television

By Martin E. Marty February 07, 2014

Can something positive appear on a popular TV comedy show? An analysis of the "edgy Catholic Sunday School teacher and TV host as a catechist who can teach other catechists much."

December 02, 2011

Your Sky is the CeilingTethered between stone and sky. (photo: Enrico Marongiu/Flickr, cc by-nc-sa 2.0)

This week’s show has a theological term in its title that sounds obscure, even impenetrable: “Monsters We Love: TV’s Pop Culture Theodicy.” Depending on your view of an omnipotent God, it could be both. ”Theodicy” attempts to answer ancient questions like, “Why do bad things happen to good people?” and “If God is good, why does evil exist?”

November 30, 2011

A playful duet between one of country music's greats and one of America's favorite children's authors — with a touching solo tribute to his father.

October 26, 2011

ZOMBIE WALK 2008A mass of people dress up for the Toronto Zombie Walk. (photo: Sam Javanrouh/Flickr, cc by-nc 2.0)

For some reason we’re experiencing a zombie moment. From zombie crawls across the globe to the record-breaking 11 million people who tuned in to watch the season premiere of AMC’s The Walking Dead, zombies are seemingly everywhere this season. Even sober institutions like The Centers for Disease Control are using zombies to teach us about disaster preparedness.

1
October 19, 2011

What shows or characters capture your attention? Send us your ideas for scenes that capture your imagination.

September 20, 2011

Clutter to save Photo by Robert Francis/Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

The A&E television show Hoarders is hugely popular for so many reasons. Maybe we see our inner hoarder in their characters, or just want to be shocked at the sight of extreme stuff. But when writer Amy Gutman decided to declutter her storage space, she developed a fascinating idea about why our stuff is so important to us.

May 26, 2010

Scene from the Season Finale of "Lost"I discovered Lost just a few seasons ago and immersed myself via Netflix with the zeal of a convert. Trent has been asking me to blog about Sunday’s finale, but honestly I’m stumped — still trying to wrap my mind around what it means. For now I am happy to pass on this from Diane Winston, one of my favorite observers of how we are telling the story of our time on television.

She called her blog on the finale “The Day After” and it starts like this:

April 01, 2010
The Peabody Awards noted Craig Ferguson's interview with Desmond Tutu as making "late-night television safe again for ideas."
July 16, 2009

Krista makes a promise an editor aims to keep.

July 15, 2009

The production staff's take on the "assignment" of watching lots of TV for the last TV show with Diane Winston.

July 14, 2009

The executive producer of Battlestar Galactica speaks to Winston's students about the religious influences embedded in the original 1978 version, including Mormon theology, numerology, and the signs of the zodiac.

January 30, 2008

making egg salad sandwiches
Photo by Bill Rogers / Flickr, cc by-nc-nd 2.0

A few weeks ago, Mr. Rogers came up at one of our production meetings, and Krista mentioned that she would have loved to interview him if he were still alive. I remember reading somewhere that Fred Rogers’s original intention in creating a television show was to try to find a space in TV broadcasting for grace.

Not a few days had passed when an episode of Mr. Rogers appeared on my family’s Tivo as a suggestion. I don’t know if PBS has just recently begun rebroadcasting the show, but I decided to see if my kids could connect with him, considering that they watch almost nothing but cartoons.

apples