violence

violence

BY Sarah Smarsh May 24, 2016

In baseball as in life, skirmishes are healthier when they're not prolonged. Looking to the animal kingdom for wisdom, Sarah Smarsh reflects on the danger of rumination without release and the healing power of bodies in motion.

BY Kineret Yardena May 09, 2016

After a teacher stays on in Poland after a five-day bearing witness retreat at Auschwitz-Birkenau, she offers a peripatetic meditation on beauty, suffering, and our capacity to comprehend what is incomprehensible.

BY Omid Safi March 31, 2016

The violence in Lahore on Easter Sunday thrusts us once again into disbelief and mourning. Omid Safi on the necessity of the right response, and the resilient stories of love and neighborliness that often go unreported in the face of terror.

BY Debra Dean Murphy March 19, 2016

As Christians enter Holy Week, a reflection on the drama of the Easter story through poetry, music, and history. Theatrical, disturbing, cathartic, and deeply necessary, the Christian encounter with the crucifixion is a reckoning with the violence of our era. And yet in resurrection there is hope and embrace.

BY NGS February 27, 2016

"Why did you stay?" A brave woman recounts her own encounter with domestic abuse and unravels the complexity of human relationships — of love and loss, of violence and tenderness, of the vicious cycles we sometimes can't extract ourselves from.

BY Omid Safi February 25, 2016

Challenged by Donald Trump's recent fear-mongering, Omid Safi asks us to look deeply into our history and ourselves and find the courage to save our democratic experiment.

BY Parker J. Palmer December 30, 2015

A serendipitous typo inspires our columnist Parker Palmer to come up with a list of five "revolutions" for the New Year, resolutions to counteract grim realities in order to regain our humanity in 2016.

BY Trent Gilliss December 29, 2015

Pining for some more glühwein, our executive editor recommends some reading by Eula Biss and Neil Gaiman, articles on covering gun violence and living Advent, and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra opening its arms to refugees in Canada, and a historic but little-heard sermon from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

BY Omid Safi December 10, 2015

Our responses to violence have become routine, which is its own tragedy. A necessary reminder that while good will is essential, it is powerless if it does not fuel our actions.

BY Sharon Salzberg December 08, 2015

Becoming fixated on a problem at the office or an injustice to others can often lead to intense anger. But, how do we avoid the narrowness of this emotion and not let it consume us?

BY Karen Costa December 01, 2015

How do we continue to bear witness when violent loss becomes cyclical? How do we mourn? An educator grapples with her own struggle to uphold the memories of the victims of the Umpqua Community College shooting, in a time when we have started to become numb to tragedy.

BY Parker J. Palmer November 18, 2015

In the wake of the Paris attacks, Parker Palmer highlights the importance of "wounded healers" and what we can do to let heartbreak open ourselves to suffering and the kindness necessary for social change.

BY Omid Safi October 01, 2015

When teaching about 9/11 and the dignity of all lives, a professor encounters a student in class who lost her father in the World Trade Center attacks. Her kind response is a reminder that we must sometimes reconcile our advocacy for, and anger towards, others with compassion for our fellow human beings.

BY Paul Singleton & III August 08, 2015

With the near-constant news of extra-judicial police killings and mass shootings, it would be easy to live in a constant state of fear. Faced with his own fragile mortality, a Buddhist contemplates our collective fear and grief. For him, meditation is not about relaxation but about awakening to life — in its wonder and in its sorrow.

BY Trent Gilliss August 04, 2015

Compelling listening on trauma and resilience as it crosses generations, and the world around us.

BY Mohammed Fairouz July 25, 2015

For the world-weary, cynicism may feel safe. But, in our efforts toward self-protection, what might we be missing? A Millennial reflects on the doubt and distrust he sees in his generation, and suggests a courageous counterpoint: sincere and hopeful optimism.

BY Holly Haworth July 18, 2015

A Southern woman's searching lament on the hot, boiling silence of Southern grief after the shootings in Charleston — and the inheritance of sorrow.

BY Paul Singleton & III June 20, 2015

The collective experiences of Black Americans can result in generational trauma that is "stored in the body." With the stories of McKinney, Texas and Charleston, South Carolina as a backdrop, a man calls for us to retrain our brains and break free from our limiting perceptions of one another to heal these divides.

BY Trent Gilliss April 21, 2015

From our gatherings in Louisville to the ekphrastic poetry for Yom HaShoah, a wealth of reading and exploring this week.

BY Parker J. Palmer April 15, 2015

Violence is what happens when we don’t know what else to do with our suffering. But how do we turn the power of suffering toward new life? It depends on our willingness to exercise our hearts so that when suffering strikes, they are suppler and more able to break open to new life.

BY Omid Safi February 05, 2015

How do we reckon with horror and injustice in the wake of Jordanian pilot Moaz al-Kasasbeh's killing by ISIS. Omid Safi on remembering and honoring the man, and not the horrible video effigy being shown over and over.

BY Parker J. Palmer October 15, 2014

More than 50 years ago, Thomas Merton warned that the pressure of modern life might distract us from the wisdom that makes work fruitful.

BY Courtney E. Martin September 10, 2014

The video of Ray Rice hitting Janay Rice has prompted all sorts of responses. Rather than resorting to humiliation and social isolation, how do we deal with generational legacies of violence when it confronts us in the news cycle? A call to see the pain before us, and create consequences and opportunities for cultural transformation — not public shaming.

BY Ken Chitwood July 17, 2014

Is the Slenderman phenomenon symptomatic of secular soul-searching in a culture robbed of religion, or a byproduct of bad religion? Or perhaps, as the author suggests, the Internet creation is one in a long line of legends filling our craving for a life imbued with mystery.

BY May 08, 2013

Much has happened in so-called Muslim-Western relations in the last decade, not the least of which is the Arab Spring. Has the paradigm changed or does it remain same? A look to the ever-changing nature of culture.

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