Yoruba

Yoruba

April 28, 2013

Religious traditions take many forms in the U.S. For a Nigerian immigrant's daughter, it's creamy frejon that's the Easter week delicacy.

December 17, 2011

A Cuban pilgrim honors Babalu Aye (San Lazaro)A woman sits next to an icon of Babalú-Ayé at the shrine of Saint Lazarus in El Rincon outside of Havana, Cuba. (photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

Each year on December 16–17, thousands of Cubans of different religious persuasions make their way to Saint Lazarus’ shrine on the the outskirts of Havana to pray for health and blessings. Some go to honor the orisha Babalú-Ayé. His name translates as “Father of the World” and he’s syncretized with his Catholic alter ego, Saint Lazarus. In the Afro-Cuban orisha pantheon, Babalú-Ayé rules over infectious diseases including small pox and AIDS. Practitioners of Afro-Cuban Santeria (also known as La Regla Ocha and La Regla Lucumi) seek his help with healing and protection from illness.

December 02, 2009

A stirring scene from Bill T. Jones' musical "Fela" inspired us to learn more about orisas.

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